Muslim leaders make call to stop support of extremist groups

Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa. (SPA)
Updated 15 June 2017

Muslim leaders make call to stop support of extremist groups

RIYADH: Muslim leaders have called on governments to stop supporting extremist groups and join Saudi-led efforts to confront terrorism.
They made the call in a statement issued during an international seminar entitled “Muslim communities in non-Muslim countries: Rights and duties,” hosted by the Muslim World League (MWL).
The seminar was held at the MWL’s main headquarters in Makkah, and was opened by its Secretary-General Sheikh Mohammed bin Abdul Karim Al-Issa.
Leaders praised the outcome of the Arab-Islamic-American Summit held in Riyadh last month, and the Kingdom’s international role in confronting extremism and terrorism.
Al-Issa expressed full support for the objectives of establishing a global center to fight extremist thoughts.
He said it is an extension of the Saudi initiative to spread tolerance, coexistence and moderation.
The final statement called for non-interference in Muslim communities and their relationships with their countries.
It also urged the MWL to establish a global communications center for Muslim minorities to strengthen their relationships with the Islamic world.


The Hajjana: heritage of Saudi Arabia’s camel riding border patrol honored

Updated 5 min 1 sec ago

The Hajjana: heritage of Saudi Arabia’s camel riding border patrol honored

The Hajjana — fearless camel riders who patrolled the Kingdom’s borders — helped pave the way for the establishment of the modern Saudi state.
Their story goes back almost 90 years when a Hajjana border patrol was established during the reign of King Abdul Aziz in 1933.
After the Kingdom’s founder reclaimed Al-Ahsa, he ordered sea and land patrols to be carried out to tighten security in the region’s border areas.
Patrols were led by camel riders, so a military sector was formed at that time known as Hajjana. Its name was derived from their means of transport — camels.
Now, nine decades later, the Camel Club has established the Royal Hajjana to commemorate the group’s distinguished cultural heritage.
Since its creation in April, the Royal Hajjana has been preparing to take part in official reception ceremonies for King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman’s guests as well as national festivals sponsored by the king and crown prince.
It will also perform in Saudi heritage shows and represent the Kingdom in local and international camel festivals.
Hajjana officers became famous throughout the country after acquiring their name from the “hejin,” or camel. They protected the Kingdom’s residents from the south of the Empty Quarter to north of the Nafud Desert.
One of the founding king’s priorities was to provide security and protect the nation’s borders, so the Border Guard was among the first military sectors created.
The Coast Guard’s budget also included allocations for Hajjana officers, known as the Hajjana patrol commanders, whose role was part of the Frontier Corps.
Patrols continued to operate in southern regions until recently. However, the memory of the Hajjana remains fresh in the minds of the Kingdom’s border guards.