Saudi Labor Ministry plans to localize small groceries

Plans are underway to localize jobs in a manner that will attract Saudi manpower and raise localization rates in high-priority sectors.
Updated 25 July 2017

Saudi Labor Ministry plans to localize small groceries

RIYADH: The Ministry of Labor and Social Development plans to limit work in small groceries to Saudi nationals, local press reported well-informed sources at the ministry as saying.
The step is expected to provide 20,000 jobs in the first year of implementation, the sources said. Plans are underway to localize jobs in a manner that will attract Saudi manpower and raise localization rates in high-priority sectors. In this context, more than 8,000 male and female Saudis were employed in the mobile sales and maintenance sector, the sources said.
In the car rental sector, more than 5,000 young Saudis are expected to take up jobs under plans to localize the sector by 100 percent.
The ministry previously announced the localization of jobs in shopping malls and centers. According to figures released by the Vision 2030 program, there are only 300,000 Saudis out of 1.5 million workers in the retail sector.
In Qasim, male and female employees working in shopping malls have stressed the importance of training in making the localization drive a success, according to the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
The localization of shopping centers in Qasim region will provide 4,000 jobs for male and female Saudis and curb cover-up businesses, they said.
The Shoura Council recently proposed the closure of small groceries and limiting retail activity to large shopping centers that will employ more male and female Saudis. The proposal received the full support of businessmen, economists and citizens.


Arabic anime voice actors prepare for new show at Riyadh expo

Updated 17 November 2019

Arabic anime voice actors prepare for new show at Riyadh expo

  • Waheed Jalal's voice acting as “Treasure Island” antagonist John Silver has captivated generations

RIYADH: Visitors to Riyadh’s first anime expo stopped by the first panel on Saturday unaware that they would be leaving the stage with memories renewed of their favorite voice actors of all time.

Waheed Jalal and Jihad Al-Atrashi will forever live on in the hearts of fans of “Grendizer” and “Treasure Island (Takarajima),” the two shows that introduced the Arab world to anime in the 1970s.

Jalal, whose voice acting as “Treasure Island” antagonist John Silver has captivated generations, expressed how delighted he was to be with the audience.

“I want to thank you and your Kingdom of generosity and culture,” he said.

Al-Atrash, who portrayed Duke Fleed, echoed his sentiments: “You are great people with great values, thank you to the people of the Kingdom that stand next to people of all nations.”

Jalal was touched by the audience’s love and warm welcome, “You guys are the reason we continued this far, without you it wouldn’t have been possible,” he told them.

“We’re persevering to this day because people loved these characters we portrayed so much, our other works pale in comparison,” he added.

Jalal said that the reason “Grendizer” remained with so many people is because of the values and morals depicted in the show, teaching generations to be loyal and loving to their nation and their people.

Artist and creator Ibrahim Al-Lami. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)

The voice acting pair talked about the importance of speaking in formal Arabic in these shows. Jalal said it’s because “you’re presenting to the entire Arab world.”

Local dialects would be difficult for others to understand, so we must all aspire to perfect our formal Arabic, added Jalal.

Before concluding the talk, a teaser was played of the first Saudi anime “Makkeen” by artist and creator, Ibrahim Al-Lami, who announced that 60 percent of the work was completed through local efforts.

“We’ll introduce a new work that is by our people, written by our people and voiced by our people,” he said to the audience.

The work will feature characters voiced by Jalal and Al-Atrash, who have become symbolic to the Arab anime world. “I told them, this work wouldn’t be complete without you two,” said Lami on his choice of voice actors. “We want these works to see the light of day. We need to provide the new generations with tales of our own,” added Al-Atrash when asked why he wanted to partake in the anime.