Alien Trump descends on Mexico in artist’s billboard

After receiving denial after denial from cities around the United States to his requests to install a billboard with President Donald Trump depicted as a character from the 1988 horror film "They Live," pop artist Mitch O'Connell got the go-ahead to install it on a main avenue in Mexico City, where it can be seen by millions of drivers every day. (AFP)
Updated 02 August 2017

Alien Trump descends on Mexico in artist’s billboard

MEXICO CITY: His skin is blue, his face contorted and his eyes bulge from his head, but the hair is unmistakable: that alien in the giant billboard over one of Mexico City’s busiest roads is Donald Trump.
In case the US president’s distinctive blond swirl didn’t tip you off, the artist has put an American flag in the background and framed the whole thing with Trump’s campaign slogan: “Make America great again.”
Ironically, this extraterrestrial Trump has landed in Mexico because he could not find a home in the United States.
American artist Mitch O’Connell created the work in 2015 for a horror film festival in Chicago headlined by the 1988 cult classic “They Live.”
But what began as a publicity poster turned into a zeitgeisty political statement, he told AFP.
“I was drawing a poster of the ‘They Live’ alien and the TV was on my drawing table. There was Trump, campaigning or doing something on television. And that hair is so distinctive. I’m looking at my drawing and at his hair and I said, ‘That hair would look fantastic on this alien,’” he said in a phone interview from Chicago.
“They Live,” a satirical sci-fi movie starring late pro wrestler “Rowdy” Roddy Piper, is the story of a drifter who discovers a pair of sunglasses that enables him to see that Earth’s ruling class is in fact made up of aliens who manipulate people via the mass media to spend money and accept the status quo.
O’Connell said his 21st-century take on the film resonated at a moment when reality TV star and real-estate billionaire Trump was starting his improbable rise to the presidency.
“Reality kind of just turned into this drawing. It was not meant to be political, but it just kind of evolved,” he said.
“People had huge reactions to Trump and they loved the movie, those two things together: America getting stranger by the week with Trump running and Trump as president.”

O’Connell, 56, initially tried to get the work displayed on a billboard in the United States, but said he was rejected in several cities — despite raising $3,000 online to fund the project.
“Major billboard companies, I think they were actually worried about getting people protesting. There was an actual real possibility that Trump would tweet about them or bash the company,” he said.
A Mexico City gallery then stepped in to get the work displayed in Mexico, the target of much vitriol from Trump.
Trump kicked off his campaign in June 2015 with a tirade against Mexican immigrants, whom he referred to as drug dealers, criminals and rapists.
Anti-Mexican rhetoric was central to his campaign, with Trump vowing to deport Mexican immigrants en masse, make Mexico pay for a wall on the border and tear up the US trade agreement with Mexico and Canada.
“Trump’s first (campaign) speech was calling everybody from Mexico rapists and thieves and how he was going to build this majestic wall to keep them out,” O’Connell said.
“Mexico being the only place where I can get this billboard erected, it was a wonderful ironic twist ending to the story.”
In Mexico City, the billboard has met with bemused approval.
“To me, artistic expression related to Trump is a really good thing, in the sense that it has an impact on society, because this is kind of how we all feel, right?” said Carla Baeza, an employee at a telecommunications company in the capital.
“I think the artist wanted to capture the essence of how Trump treats Mexicans. He doesn’t respect us much,” said computer programmer Julio Acuna.


Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

Updated 39 min 52 sec ago

Ethiopian PM says troops ordered to move on Tigray capital

NAIROBI, Kenya: Ethiopia’s prime minister says the army has been ordered to move on the embattled Tigray capital after his 72-hour ultimatum for Tigray leaders to surrender ended, and he warns residents to “stay indoors.”
The statement Thursday by Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s office means tanks and other weaponry can now close in on the city of some half-million people. His government has warned of “no mercy” if residents don’t move away from the Tigray leaders in time.
The new statement asserts that thousands of Tigray militia and special forces surrendered during the 72-hour period. “We will take utmost care to protect civilians,” it says.
Communications remain severed to Tigray, making it difficult to verify claims.
THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. AP’s earlier story follows below:
The United Nations says shortages have become “very critical” in Ethiopia’s embattled Tigray region as its population of 6 million remains sealed off and its capital is under threat of attack by Ethiopian forces seeking to arrest the regional leaders.
Fuel and cash are running out, more than 1 million people are now estimated to be displaced and food for nearly 100,000 refugees from Eritrea will be gone in a week, according to a new report released overnight. And more than 600,000 people who rely on monthly food rations haven’t received them this month.
Travel blockages are so dire that even within the Tigray capital, Mekele, the UN World Food Program cannot obtain access to transport food from its warehouses there.
Communications and travel links remain severed with the Tigray region since the deadly conflict broke out on Nov. 4, and now Human Rights Watch is warning that “actions that deliberately impede relief supplies” violate international humanitarian law.
Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed’s 72-hour ultimatum for the Tigray People’s Liberation Front leaders to surrender ended Wednesday night. His government has said Mekele is surrounded.
The UN has reported people fleeing the city. Abiy’s government had warned them of “no mercy” if residents didn’t move away from the TPLF leaders who are accused of hiding among the population.
But with communications cut, it’s not clear how many people in Mekele received the warnings. The alarmed international community is calling for immediate de-escalation, dialogue and humanitarian access.
Abiy on Wednesday, however, rejected international “interference.”