Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. (Reuters)
Updated 02 August 2017

Al Etihad Credit Bureau starts issuing commercial credit scores to UAE businesses

DUBAI: Al Etihad Credit Bureau on Wednesday said it has began issuing commercial credit scores to businesses in the UAE.
The three digit scores — ranging from 300 to 900 — determine the creditworthiness and risks of default of a company. It is calculated using information from various sources, like banks, finance companies and telecom companies. The higher the score, the lower the risk of default.
“The launch of the Commercial Credit Score will help banks and other commercial lenders to assess the risk from the time of application throughout the entire lending relationship,” Marwan Ahmad Lutfi, chief executive of Al Etihad Credit Bureau said in a statement.
Companies can obtain their credit scores by visiting the bureau’s customer service centers in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, and presenting documents such as the original Emirates ID of company’s owner or the company’s authorized signatory, original trade license, the original articles of association of the company and a valid e-mail address.
A standard commercial report — with no score — costs Dh180, while a report with a score costs Dh220. A credit report for an individual or establishment without a score costs Dh100 while it costs an additional Dh50 to get one with a score. A credit score only, with no report, costs Dh60.
According to international best practices, a good commercial credit score assists small and medium enterprises in accessing the credit market because the analytic and predictive score indicates the likelihood of future default and the effectiveness of current management, the bureau said.


Saudi Aramco sets IPO share price between 30-32 riyals

Updated 8 min 44 sec ago

Saudi Aramco sets IPO share price between 30-32 riyals

  • Saudi Aramco intends to buy $1 billion worth of shares for employee

DUBAI: Saudi Aramco’s multibillion-dollar initial public offering (IPO), probably the biggest in history, shifted to full gear as its share price was announced and subscription to the world’s biggest oil company commenced on Sunday.

Saudi Aramco set an indicative share price between 30 and 32 riyals for the 1.5 percent of its oustanding shares – or about 3 billion shares of its 20 billion regular shares – that it would offer for the domestic part of its public offering. The blockbuster IPO could be worth least $24 billion, and values the state-owned oil giant at up to $1.71 trillion.

The offering – or book-building – period for institutional subscribers, which started today, closes on December 4 while the retail offering for individual investors will begin on November 21 and will end on November 28. Individual investors will subscribe based on a price of 32 riyals, the top end of the price range, the company noted in a document.

The final pricing for the Aramco shares would be announced on December 5, and Saudi Tadawul  – the Kingdom’s stock exchange – would make an announcement when initial trading day would be, the company added.

___

For more of our coverage of the Aramco IPO, click here.

To view key Aramco IPO documents, click here.

___

Samba Capital & Investment Management Company has been designated as issue manager while National Commercial Bank, Saudi British Bank, Samba Financial Group, Saudi Investment Bank, Alawwal Bank, Arab National Bank, Albilad Bank, Aljazira Bank, Riyad Bank, Al Rajhi Bank, Alinma Bank, Banque Saudi Fransi and Gulf International Bank were named as receiving banks.

If there are applications for more than the 0.5 percent on offer — amounting to 1 billion shares — allocations to private investors will be scaled back proportionate to demand; if there are fewer applications than the 0.5 percent when all maximum applications are satisfied, private investors can have the over-payment refunded either in cash via the receiving banks or in the form of extra shares in Aramco.

There is an incentive mechanism in the IPO whereby Saudi investors will receive a bonus one-for-ten allocation of shares, up to a maximum of 100 shares, if they do not sell shares in the market for a period of six months after dealings begin in December, at a date still to be determined.

Saudi Aramco also intends to buy $1 billion worth of shares for employees under a plan to incentivize executives and staff members alongside the IPO next month.

The plan — which was disclosed in the IPO prospectus — will involve Aramco buying the shares from the government and making them available for employees under special terms.