3 wanted terrorists surrender in Qatif: Saudi interior ministry

Prince Saud bin Naif bin Abdulaziz, governor of the Eastern Province, visits security officers who were injured in line of duty in the town of Awamiya in Qatif over the weekend. The Saudi Interior Ministry confirmed on Monday that three men from a list of 23 wanted terrorists in Qatif have surrendered to security forces. (Photo courtesy: Ministry of Interior website)
Updated 08 August 2017

3 wanted terrorists surrender in Qatif: Saudi interior ministry

JEDDAH: The Saudi Interior Ministry confirmed on Monday that three men from a list of 23 wanted terrorists have surrendered to security forces.
Ministry spokesman Maj. Gen. Mansour Al-Turki said that Ali H. Al-Zaid, Ramzi M. Al-Jammal and Mohammed Al-Lubbad, all Saudi citizens, gave themselves up to the security authorities.
Al-Turki said their voluntary surrender would be taken into consideration, and that they will be treated according to the laws in force.
It emerged on Sunday that two of the men had surrendered in Qatif in eastern Saudi Arabia, with confirmation of a third man having given himself up coming later.
The ministry warned of grave consequences for anyone sheltering, hiding or offering any kind of assistance to wanted criminals.
Only three fugitives are still at large from a list of 23 terrorists issued in 2012. They are Salman A. Al-Faraj, Fadel H. Al-Safwani, and Mohammed H. Al-Zaid.
The ministry had already renewed its call to the rest of the wanted fugitives to surrender, and called upon anyone with information about them to inform the authorities.
Sheikh Mohammed Al-Ebidan, former judge in the Court of Endowments and Inheritance in Qatif, called upon terrorist groups to give themselves up, refrain from carrying weapons, and answer the call of Eastern Province Gov. Prince Saud bin Naif.
Prince Saud told Al Arabiya News Channel earlier: “My message to those is to let this country remain stable and in peace. Enough with the innocent blood they have shed so far. I call upon them to give themselves up to the responsible authorities, and, God willing, they will see nothing but good matters.”
Sheikh Mohammed Al-Ebidan stressed that “terrorism and terrorists are a cancerous gland our secure country has been infected with.”
Concerning the damage terrorists brought upon Qatif and its people, Sheikh Mohammed said: “We all know the extent of harm which has been brought upon this area due to carrying weapons, resisting security forces, killing innocent people, and the adverse effects caused by such behavior. All this necessitated a strong and serious stance to put an end to the bloodshed, especially since this has drawn the region to unwanted miseries, and it may draw it in the future to other calamities.”
Sheikh Ebidan called for “the return of that spirit which existed, and still exists, among the people of Qatif, who strongly want peace.”


Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

Updated 39 min 22 sec ago

Saudi labor minister urges Kingdom to increase economic role of charity sector

  • Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP”

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia needed to increase the contribution of the non-profit sector to the Kingdom’s economic and social development, the country’s labor minister told business conference delegates on Thursday.

Moderating a session on the subject during the final day of the Riyadh Economic Forum (REF), Saudi Minister of Labor and Social Development Ahmad Al-Rajhi said: “Our effort is to increase the share of the non-profit sector in GDP.”

Describing the non-profit sector as the third pillar of sustainable economic development, the minister pointed out that in developed countries its average contribution toward GDP had reached 6 percent.

Referring to a REF study on the sector, he noted that it was only during the last decade that the Kingdom had come to realize its important role in economic development, social participation, job creation, and promoting the culture of teamwork.

“The non-profit sector contributes to Saudi Arabia’s GDP by one percent and our effort is to increase the share,” Al-Rajhi told the session’s attendees.

Presenting the REF study, Yousef bin Othman Al-Huzeim, secretary-general of Al-Anoud Charitable Foundation, said: “This sector, together with its substantial developmental roles, has become a criterion for the overall progress of nations and a yardstick of their civilization and humanitarian activity rather than a mere indicator of individuals’ income.”

He added that the sector had a key part to play in helping to realize the Saudi Vision 2030 goal of achieving sustainable development through diversification, and that the aim was to raise its level of contribution to the country’s GDP from 1 percent to 5 percent by 2030.

The study stressed the need to transform the sector from a mere initiative into an institutional entity concerned with social investment and integration, in cooperation with the public and private sectors.

Among its key findings, the study highlighted the requirement to increase the awareness of sector employees and supervising agencies about the development needs of society.

A lack of detailed information on the non-profit sector in the Kingdom was also having a negative effect on the extent of its contribution to economic and social development, the study found.

The media too had failed to give enough coverage to the sector and rules and regulations often stood in the way of any expansion in individual and community partnerships through charities and trusts.

Princess Nouf bint Mohammed Al-Saud, CEO of the King Khalid Foundation (KKF), said women were the most important enablers of the non-profit sector.

Currently, the most prominent development was the system of NGOs and philanthropic associations, and the stimulation of the sector to implement good governance, she added.

The princess urged the lifting of restrictions on money transfers to the non-profit sector and tax exemptions on charities and donations.

The KKF had issued a number of regulations to help the non-profit sector, she said, but there was still a need for the creation of more executive programs in order to realize Vision 2030 goals.

Rajaa bin Manahi Al-Marzouqi, a professor of economics at Prince Saud Al-Faisal Institute for Diplomatic Studies, in Riyadh, said: “If we look at any economy, it consists of three important sectors, which are the government, private, and non-profit sectors. There is a need to develop the non-profit sector in such a way that it sustains in the long run and contributes to socio-economic development.”