Sacrificial animals’ prices soar ahead of Eid Al-Adha in Saudi Arabia

The Kingdom imports a huge number of sacrificial livestock for Eid Al-Adha. (SPA)
Updated 31 August 2017
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Sacrificial animals’ prices soar ahead of Eid Al-Adha in Saudi Arabia

RIYADH: Prices of sacrificial animals are soaring as residents throng to Riyadh’s cattle markets ahead of Eid Al-Adha on Friday.
The markets are swarming with buyers and sellers, and the festive mood is evident, with public sector offices having started the Eid Al-Adha holiday last Friday, while a six-day holiday will begin on Thursday for the private sector.
Residents browse for cattle to slaughter, an important ritual during this festival of sacrifice. Goats, sheep, cows and camels are among the animals slaughtered in commemoration of the Prophet Ibrahim’s readiness to sacrifice his son Ismail to show obedience to Allah.
When Ibrahim was about to obey Allah's order, He told Ibrahim to sacrifice a sheep instead.
The tradition of sacrificing an animal during this holiday commemorates this noble gesture.
But many people are concerned about the soaring prices. Shabbir Ahmed, a buyer in Al-Azizia district, which has a big cattle market, said prices at the market are higher than in previous years.
Mahmoud, a trader at the market, cited hikes in fodder prices as the reason for the soaring animal prices. 
The Kingdom imports a huge number of sacrificial livestock for Eid Al-Adha, given the number of pilgrims who perform Hajj every year.
Municipalities across the Kingdom have mobilized efforts to organize slaughterhouses, allocate points for slaughtering, and temporarily allow public kitchens to undertake the process to avoid the hazards of random slaughtering.
The price for slaughtering is fixed at SR100 ($26.67) in most of the Kingdom.


Sirens to ring out over Riyadh as Saudi’s Civil Defense test warning system

Updated 54 min 19 sec ago

Sirens to ring out over Riyadh as Saudi’s Civil Defense test warning system

Warning sirens will sound over Riyadh on Thursday as the General Directorate of Civil Defense carries out tests on its public alarm system.

The test, which will also take place in Ad-Dilam, Diriyah and Khafji, are being carried out to ensure the sirens are effective and ready, Directorate of Civil Defense spokesman in Riyadh, Lt. Col. Mohammed Al-Hammadi, said.

The tests come as Saudi Arabia – backed by international world powers – investigates Saturday’s attacks on the Aramco oil facilities.

The Saudi Aramco facilities were hit in drone strikes earlier this week, causing fires to break out.

The Houthis claimed responsibility, but the United States believes the attacks originated in southwestern Iran, a US official told Reuters, an assessment that further increases tension in the Middle East.

In response, Iran issued a denial, warning it would respond to any attacks.