Pilgrims benefit from projects in Makkah, holy sites

The Grand Mosque in Makkah has the capacity to accommodate around 1.8 million pilgrims following its third expansion. (SPA)
Updated 31 August 2017

Pilgrims benefit from projects in Makkah, holy sites

MAKKAH: Projects carried out by the government in Makkah and the holy sites are facilitating pilgrims’ movement and providing them with the services they need to complete their Hajj comfortably and easily.
The Makkah Development Authority has implemented 14 projects worth SR300 million ($80 million).
The most prominent projects are the third expansion of the Grand Mosque (the largest expansion in Saudi history), the Jamaarat facility, the Muaissem slaughterhouse, the shuttle bus service, Al-Mashaaer Metro, pedestrian routes separated from vehicle traffic, fire-resistant tents and the removal of slums.
The Jamaarat facility has attracted global attention for its advanced architectural construction and its ability to hold millions of people without any major incident.
Al-Mashaaer Metro is expected to accommodate more than 350,000 pilgrims this year. Maj. Gen. Hamid Al-Jahdali, assistant commander of Hajj security forces, said 9,500 soldiers and officers will help with crowd management at the metro.
“We have 17 trains, each has 12 vehicles, and each vehicle can accommodate 250 people, including 50 seats for the elderly and 200 standing,” he said.
“The total capacity of each metro is 3,200 passengers in nine stations. The total number of passengers will be 72,000 passengers per hour.”


Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

Updated 01 April 2020

Saudi authorities arrest coronavirus curfew violator after posting haircut video

  • Saudi prosecutor warned of legal consequences earlier
  • Violators could be fined up to $796,880 and jailed for up to 5 years

DUBAI: Saudi police arrested a man in Al-Qassim who violated coronavirus regulations by bringing a barber into his home, state news agency SPA reported.
Videos circulating on social media showed the man as he asked a barber to come into his house after authorities temporarily closed down barber shops and salons to curb the spread of COVID-19.
The Saudi public prosecutor has previously warned that anyone posting content on social media, including photos or videos showing curfew violations, or the flouting of any rules enforced to prevent the spread of COVID-19 face prosecution.
In a message posted on Twitter, the bureau said that perpetrators will be charged under Article Six of the Information Crime Prevention Law, which carries a punishment of up to five years in prison and a fine of up to $796,880. 
The punishment will be applied to violators but informers will not be questioned, it added.