Beyonce, Streisand to headline Harvey relief telethon

Beyonce
Updated 07 September 2017

Beyonce, Streisand to headline Harvey relief telethon

NEW YORK: Beyonce, Blake Shelton, Barbra Streisand and Oprah Winfrey will headline a one-hour telethon to benefit Hurricane Harvey victims that will be simulcast next week on ABC, CBS, NBC, Fox and CMT.
The event will be telecast live at 8 p.m. Eastern on Sept. 12, and on tape delay at 8 p.m. on the West Coast, and streamed live on Facebook, YouTube and Twitter. Houston rap artist Bun B and Scooter Braun, a Hollywood talent manager and founder of SB Projects, are the organizers.
Bun B, a Houston native and lecturer at Rice University, said he was trying to organize a local event through his contacts and recognized that Harvey was a broader tragedy.
“One morning it just hit me — this is a national disaster,” he said. “It is personal for me because it is home to me, it s in my city, but it is a national disaster.”
He enlisted the help of Braun, who has worked with Usher, Ariana Grande, Kanye West, Justin Bieber and others, to tap into his Hollywood contacts. Within 48 hours of trying, they reached agreements with the television networks to carry the event.
Braun said he hoped the telethon could be a unifying event for a country that has seen so much division. The organizers said they were inspired by television reports of volunteers who formed a human chain to help rescue one Houston victim from the flood.
“People want a sense of unity,” Braun said.
George Clooney, Drake, Matthew McConaughey, Dennis Quaid, Julia Roberts, Jamie Foxx, Ryan Seacrest, Michael Strahan, Kelly Rowland, George Strait, Reese Witherspoon and others will also participate with taped or live messages or staffing phone banks. Journalists Matt Lauer and Norah O’Donnell will also participate. More celebrities are expected.
Several organizations will benefit, including United Way of Greater Houston, Habitat for Humanity, Save the Children, Direct Relief, Feeding Texas and The Mayor’s Fund for Hurricane Harvey Relief.
Other entertainment figures have already stepped up to help flood victims in the past week. The ABC networks held a “day of giving” that has raised more than $15 million, and singers Paul Simon and Edie Brickell pledged $1 million.
While the telethon will be helping Harvey’s victims, “by Tuesday we might be helping more than them,” Braun said, a reference to powerful Hurricane Irma in the Atlantic Ocean, which may threaten Florida and the southern US this weekend.
The telethon will air from Los Angeles, but there will be stages in New York and Nashville, Tennessee. A performance from George Strait’s San Antonio benefit concert for Harvey will also be shown.
“The telethon is going to be good,” Braun said. “We are going to put on a great show. The reason we want people to tune is because we want people to show who we are. That is our goal — to bring the idea that people care about each other back.”


Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

Updated 16 November 2019

Australian man survives croc attack by gouging its eye

  • Wildlife ranger Craig Dickmann made a split-second decision to go fishing in a remote part of Northern Australia known as ‘croc country.’
  • ‘That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws’

CAIRNS, Australia: An Australian wildlife ranger has recounted his terrifying escape from the clutches of a “particularly cunning” crocodile, after wrestling with the reptile and sticking a finger in its eye.
Craig Dickmann, who made a split-second decision to go fishing last Sunday in a remote part of Northern Australia known as “croc country” last Sunday, said a 2.8-meter (nine-foot) crocodile came up from behind him as he was leaving the beach.
“As I’ve turned to go, the first thing I see is its head just come at me,” he told reporters on Friday from his hospital bed in the town of Cairns in Queensland state.
Dickmann said the animal latched on to his thigh.
“That noise will haunt me forever I think, the sound of the snap of its jaws,” he said.
The 54-year-old said he wrestled with the croc on the remote beach as it tried to drag him into the water.
Dickmann stuck his thumb into its eye, saying it was the only “soft spot” he found on the “bullet-proof” animal.
“Their eyes retract a fair way and when you go down far enough you can feel bone so I pushed as far as I possibly could and then it let go at that point,” Dickmann said.
After a few minutes, he said he managed to get on top of the croc and pin its jaws shut.
“And then, I think both the croc and I had a moment where we’re going, ‘well, what do we do now?’”
Dickmann said he then pushed the croc away from him and it slid back into the water.
The ranger had skin ripped from his hands and legs in the ordeal and drove more than 45 minutes back to his home before calling emergency services.
It was then another hour in the car to meet the Royal Flying Doctors Service who flew him to Cairns Hospital, where he is recovering from the ordeal.
“This croc was particularly cunning and particularly devious,” he said.
Queensland’s department of environment this week euthanized the animal.
“The area is known croc country and people in the area are reminded to always be crocwise,” the department said in a statement.
Saltwater crocodiles, which can grow up to seven meters long and weigh more than a ton, are common in the vast continent’s tropical north.
Their numbers have exploded since they were declared a protected species in the 1970s, with attacks on humans rare.
According to the state government, the last non-fatal attack was in January 2018 in the Torres Strait while the last death was in October 2017 in Port Douglas.