PLO outraged over 85% increase in Israeli settlement activity

An Israeli soldier fires a weapon during clashes with Palestinians following a protest against the nearby Jewish settlement of Qadomem, in the West Bank village of Kofr Qadom near Nablus. (Reuters)
Updated 08 September 2017

PLO outraged over 85% increase in Israeli settlement activity

PHILADELPHIA: Arab News has obtained a four-page letter sent on Sept. 5 by Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) Secretary-General Saeb Erekat to Palestinian diplomatic missions expressing anger over increased Israeli settlement activity.
Erekat, who is also chief Palestinian negotiator, said in the letter that Israel has increased settlement activity by 85 percent so far this year compared to 2016.
“Israeli unlawful practices have included at least 56 plans for 4,909 colonial settlement units between January-August 2017,” he wrote.
The biggest settlement hot spots are Jerusalem and Hebron. In Hebron, Israel has granted the 800 Jewish settlers living illegally in the heart of the 200,000-strong Palestinian city separate legal status.
While the city is divided into two separate areas, H1 under Palestinian control and H2 under Israeli control, both parts fall under the administrative control of the Palestinian municipality.
The separate legal status for settlers has created an apartheid-like situation in Hebron, where a tiny minority has preferential treatment over the majority.
The Associated Press (AP) reported that the military order, signed on Aug. 31, alters a 20-year-old agreement and “establishes a new municipal services administration for the Jewish neighborhood.”
AP quoted the order as saying: “An administration will be established to represent the residents of the Jewish neighborhood in Hebron and to provide them with municipal services in a variety of fields.”
In his letter, Erekat called Israel’s decision a clear violation of the Hebron protocol signed in 1997 by then-Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Hebron Gov. Kamel Hmeid said Israel’s decision is the “most dangerous one since 1967, which prepares to apply total Israeli sovereignty and will create further chaos and instability throughout Palestinian governorates.”
At the time the order was signed, Israeli NGO Peace Now said: “By granting an official status to the Hebron settlers, the Israeli government is formalizing the apartheid system in the city. This step, which happened immediately following the announcement on the evacuation of the settlers who took over a house in Hebron, is another illustration of the policy of compensating the most extreme settlers for their illegal actions.”
Peace Now said the Israeli order “does not create a new local authority or a new community within a regional authority, but rather a settler body with a certain degree of administrative power,” which would not include any Palestinian representation.
Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah said the order is a “violation of international humanitarian law and international conventions.”
Hamdallah, who met Wednesday with the newly elected mayor and members of the Hebron city council, promised to provide “whatever is necessary to support the steadfastness of our people in the face of constant violations from the occupiers and settlers.”
Osama Qawasmeh, a spokesman for Fatah in Hebron and a member of the Palestinian faction’s revolutionary council, warned of a “grave disaster” for Hebron’s people, history and heritage if the Israeli order is not stopped.
Hamas spokesman Abdel Latif Qanouh said the order “contradicts international conventions and reflects the extremism of the occupation government, and further escalates apartheid policies.”


Iraqi protesters block commercial ports, split capital

Updated 19 November 2019

Iraqi protesters block commercial ports, split capital

  • Iraqi civilians are increasingly relying on boats to ferry them across the Tigris River as ongoing standoffs shut key bridges in Baghdad
  • The Jumhuriya, Sinak and Ahrar bridges connect both sides of the city by passing over the river

BAGHDAD: Anti-government protesters blocked access to a second major commercial port in southern Iraq on Tuesday, as bridge closures effectively split the capital in half, causing citizens to rely on boats for transport to reach the other side of the city.
Since anti-government protests began Oct. 1, at least 320 people have been killed and thousands wounded in Baghdad and the mostly Shiite southern provinces. Demonstrators have taken to the streets in the tens of thousands over what they say is widespread corruption, lack of job opportunities and poor basic services, despite the country’s oil wealth.
Security forces have used live ammunition, tear gas and stun guns to repel protesters, tactics that Secretary of State Mike Pompeo said Monday would be punished with sanctions.
“We will not stand idle while the corrupt officials make the Iraqi people suffer. Today, I am affirming the United States will use our legal authorities to sanction corrupt individuals that are stealing Iraqis’ wealth and those killing and wounding peaceful protesters,” he said in remarks to reporters in Washington.
“Like the Iraqi people taking to the streets today, our sanctions will not discriminate between religious sect or ethnicity,” he added. “They will simply target those who do wrong to the Iraqi people, no matter who they are.”
Over a dozen protesters blocked the main entrance to Khor Al-Zubair port, halting trade activity as oil tankers and other trucks carrying goods were unable to enter or exit. The port imports commercial goods and materials as well as refined oil products.
Crude from Qayara oil field in Ninewa province, in northern Iraq, is also exported from the port.
Khor Al-Zubair is the second largest port in the country. Protesters had burned tires and cut access to the main Gulf commercial port in Umm Qasr on Monday and continued to block roads Tuesday.
Iraqi civilians are increasingly relying on boats to ferry them across the Tigris River as ongoing standoffs between demonstrators and Iraqi security forces on three key bridges has shut main thoroughfares connecting east and west Baghdad.
The Jumhuriya, Sinak and Ahrar bridges, which have been partially occupied by protesters following days of deadly clashes, connect both sides of the city by passing over the Tigris River. The blockages have left Iraqis who must make the daily commute for work, school and other day-to-day activities with no choice but to rely on river boats.
“After the bridges were cut, all the pressure is on us here,” said Hasan Lilo, a boat owner in the capital. “We offer a reasonable transportation means that helps the people.”