After 3,500 years, an Egyptian goldsmith gives up his secrets

An Egyptian archaeologist restoring a wooden sacrophagus at a newly-uncovered ancient tomb in Luxor. (AFP)
Updated 09 September 2017

After 3,500 years, an Egyptian goldsmith gives up his secrets

CAIRO: Egyptian archaeologists have uncovered a tomb in the city of Luxor belonging to a royal goldsmith who lived more than 3,500 years ago.
The tomb on the West Bank of the Nile River dates from the 18th Dynasty and belongs to Amenemhat, a goldsmith dedicated to the ancient god Amun-Re.
The site consists of a courtyard and niche where archaeologists found a statue of Amenemhat, his wife and their son, as well as two burial shafts.
The first shaft contains a collection of mummies, sarcophagi and funeral masks and figurines. The second shaft contained mummies from the 21st and 22nd Dynasties, about 3,000 years ago.
The discovery was made by an Egyptian archaeological mission led by Mostafa Waziri, head of Luxor Antiquities.
“The ministry promised that 2017 would be the year of excavations, and that’s what we are doing,” he told Arab News.
The statue shows Amenemhat sitting on a high-backed chair beside his wife, who is wearing a long dress and wig. Between them is the small figure of one of their sons.
In the open courtyard, the mummies of a woman and her two children were also unearthed.
During the excavation, the archaeologists found several jewelry and funeral objects, some of which belong to the tomb owner, Waziri added.
The latest discovery came after six years of excavation, and Waziri said there was more to discover in the necropolis area on Luxor’s west bank.
Saturday’s announcement will boost Egypt’s slowly recovering tourism industry by attracting tourists to explore the newly found ancient relics.
Dr. Yousef Khalifa, Egypt’s former head of antiquities, told Arab News: “Luxor alone has one-third of the world’s ancient monuments and visitors will enjoy exploring the the newly found ancient Egyptian relics.
“The museum there works on presenting and renewing its display for visitors who appreciate such finds.”


Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

Updated 20 October 2019

Sheep take over streets of Madrid for annual migration

  • The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock
  • The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats

MADRID: Sheep replaced traffic on the streets of Madrid on Sunday as shepherds steered their flocks through the heart of the Spanish capital, following ancient migration routes.
The annual event, which started in 1994, allows shepherds to exercise their right to use traditional routes to migrate their livestock from northern Spain to more southerly pastures for winter grazing.
The route would have taken them through undeveloped countryside a few centuries ago, but today it cuts through Madrid’s bustling city center and along some of its most famous streets.
Sheep farmers pay a nominal charge in symbolic acknowledgement of a 1418 agreement with the city council that set a fee of 50 maravedis — medieval coins — per 1,000 sheep brought through the central Sol square and Gran Via street.
The herd includes 2,000 merino sheep and 100 goats.