Hillary Clinton says Brexit uncertainty affecting children

Former U.S. Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, poses for a photograph with local schoolchildren at Swansea University after receiving an honorary degree, in Swansea, Britain on Saturday. (REUTERS)
Updated 15 October 2017

Hillary Clinton says Brexit uncertainty affecting children

LONDON: Children are being given “short shrift” in the Brexit process, with some left feeling worried and unsafe, Hillary Clinton said Saturday.
The 2016 US presidential candidate spoke at Swansea University in Wales, which presented her with an honorary doctorate.
Clinton said uncertainty about the future rights of some 3 million European Union citizens living in Britain means “the residency rights of half a million children, including many who were born in the UK, are hanging in the balance.”
The ex-US secretary of state said “there are reports of children being worried, feeling uncertain, even unsafe.”
Swansea University honored Clinton for her work promoting the rights of families and children, a cause the school shares.
It has renamed its college of law the Hillary Rodham Clinton School of Law.
Clinton lamented what she called divisive politics and rhetoric on both sides of the Atlantic, saying “currents of anger and resentment are underpinning our national conversation” in the United States.
In a direct swipe at President Donald Trump, she said that “instead of bringing people together, we have leaders who stoke our divisions, try to distract us with controversy after controversy, and undermine free speech and the press.”


Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

Updated 23 February 2020

Protests in New Delhi against India’s citizenship law ahead of Trump visit

  • Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it
  • The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India

NEW DELHI: Police used tear gas to disperse large crowds in India’s capital of New Delhi on Sunday in the latest eruption of violence at protests over a new citizenship law, police officials said.
Hundreds of people supporting the new law clashed with those opposing it, with the two groups pelting each other with stones in the Maujpur area in the northeastern part of the city, according to television footage.
“There must be some miscreants who want to spoil the peace in the area. We will identify them and take action against them,” Alok Kumar, a senior Delhi police official, told reporters about the protest.
“The situation is under control now,” he added.
The protest comes just a day before US President Donald Trump begins a two-day visit to India, where he is expected to raise the issue of religious freedom in the country with Prime Minister Narendra Modi.
India’s Citizenship Amendment Act, which eases the path for non-Muslims from neighboring Muslim-majority nations to gain citizenship, has triggered weeks of sometimes violent protests against Modi’s government.
The Indian law is seen by opponents as discriminating against Muslims and has deepened concerns that Modi’s administration is undermining India’s secular traditions.
Modi’s ruling Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party denies any bias against the country’s 180 million Muslims.
On Sunday, a separate protest also erupted in the northern Indian city of Aligarh, where protesters threw stones at the police, state administration official Chandra Bhushan Singh said.
The Internet in the area had been suspended until midnight, he added.