Saudi Economic Affairs Council reaffirms commitment to the rights of individuals and corporates

Saudi crown prince chairs the Saudi Economic Affairs Council. (SPA)
Updated 08 November 2017

Saudi Economic Affairs Council reaffirms commitment to the rights of individuals and corporates

RIYADH: Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman presided over a regular meeting of the Council of Economic and Development Affairs at Al-Yamamah Palace on Tuesday.

The council reviewed the recent royal decree to establish a supreme committee for the investigation of public corruption.

The chairman of the council instructed the relevant ministers to ensure that national and multinational companies operating inside and outside the Kingdom, including those wholly or partly owned by individuals under investigation, were not disrupted while investigations into corruption were underway.

The council recognized the importance of these companies for the national economy, and the importance of ensuring that investors could operate with confidence in Saudi Arabia.

The council stressed that the Saudi government was fully committed to protecting the rights of individuals under investigation and would ensure their fair treatment by the justice system.

The council stated that tackling corruption within the rule of law and preventing the waste of public funds was crucial for the sustainable growth of the national economy, and for the fair treatment of all Saudis.

Anti-corruption measures taken by the state were a key part of Vision 2030, and were vital to ensure stability and to protect investments by domestic and international investors and provides a level playing field.


Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

Updated 06 December 2019

Recent archaeological discoveries highlight Saudi Arabia as ‘a cradle of human civilizations,’ Rome conference told

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia has become a leader in the field of archaeological research in the past five years, a major exhibition in Rome was told.

Abdullah Al-Zahrani, director-general of archaeological research and studies at the Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage, said that 44 international archaeological missions had been carried out this year in the Kingdom.

He was speaking on the sidelines of the “Roads of Arabia: Masterpieces of Antiquities in Saudi Arabia Across the Ages” exhibition, which opened at the National Museum of Rome on Nov. 26.

The groundbreaking exhibition was inaugurated by Saudi Minister of Culture Badr bin Abdullah bin Farhan and Italian Minister of Cultural Heritage and Activities Dario Franceschini.

Al-Zahrani said that the Kingdom “has become one of the most advanced countries in terms of archaeological disclosures.”

“Recent discoveries by local and international missions have highlighted the Kingdom’s historical status and cultural depth as the cradle of the beginnings of human civilizations,” he said.

Archaeological discoveries continue to “instil the civilized dimension of the Kingdom,” he said.

“The religious, political, economic and cultural stature that Saudi Arabia enjoys is an extension of its long cultural heritage, in addition to its distinctive geographical position as a bridge and hub of cultural interaction between East and West that made it a meeting point for international land and sea trade routes throughout all ages,” he added.