Tasmeem Fair gathers interior designers in Jeddah

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Attendees admiring the innovative designs of Ahmad Angawi at Tasmeem Fair in Jeddah on November 18, 2017. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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A depiction of historical Ottoman Empire ships at Ammar Alamdar’s “Pavillion” at Tasmeem Fair in Jeddah on November 18, 2017. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Malak Masallati’s 70s inspired merry-go-round “Lafeef” at Tasmeem Fair in Jeddah on November 18, 2017. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Redefining the art of Islamic geometric wood-art “Roshan” by Hanadi Karkashan in Jeddah on November 18, 2017. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
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Visitors attend one of the main halls of Tasmeem Fair in Jeddah on November 18, 2017. (AN photo by Huda Bashatah)
Updated 20 November 2017

Tasmeem Fair gathers interior designers in Jeddah

JEDDAH: Tasmeem, a non-profit initiative by the Saudi Art Council has opened in Jeddah for the first time.
The initiative is a platform to showcase the works of Saudi interior designers, present their works in a different light, and allow visitors to step into their minds. Since the initial announcement by the Saudi Art Council last August, over 300 participants had applied.

The brainchild of Nawaf Nassar and under the patronage of Princess Jawaher bint Majid, organizers Nawaf Nasser, Kholoud Attar, Lama Mansour and Johara Beydoun have selected the finest and most innovative designers that were able to apply the concept of reflection to their displays.

“The council’s main purpose is to promote art in all its forms, and for the first time, interior designers have been selected to be a part of the movement instigated by the council. The plan was set in motion this year under the guidance of Princess Jawaher, and it was the right time and place for us. They’re an integrated part of the art society and I am proud to have them here under one roof,” said Nasser.

The fair’s displays are varied and the 16 selected, 11 of which are women, have filled a space in unison with their fellow participants. A number of workshops will be given by Dr. Douha Attiah, Ahmad Angawi and more. There will be special talks as well by Dr. Zuhair Fayez, Hsham Malaika, Dr. Rana Kadi and others.

“I was surprised and very pleased with the level of unprecedented professionalism of our Saudi interior designers. The volume of portfolios that we received is proof of their enthusiasm, elevated sense of style, and their level of awareness and intellect. This is a chance for the audience to get to know more about interior design and I’m confident that each season will be better than the previous,” said Princess Jawaher bint Majid.

Located in SAC’s Gold Moor headquarters in the Shatea district, Tasmeem Fair is open to all from November 18-28.


Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

Updated 15 September 2019

Iraq denies links to drone attack on Saudi oil facilities

  • The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen
  • ‘Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors’

BAGHDAD: Baghdad on Sunday denied any link to drone attacks on Saudi oil plants, after media speculation that the strikes were launched from Iraq despite being claimed by Yemeni rebels.
The attacks early Saturday targeted two key oil installations, causing massive fires and taking out half of the kingdom’s vast oil output.
The operation was claimed by Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen, where a Saudi-led coalition is bogged down in a five-year war.
But the Wall Street Journal has reported that officials were investigating the possibility the attacks involved missiles launched from Iraq or Iran.
Prime Minister Adel Abdel Mahdi on Sunday denied reports Iraqi territory “was used for drone attacks on Saudi oil facilities.”
“Iraq is constitutionally committed to preventing any use of its soil to attack its neighbors,” he said in a statement.
“The Iraqi government will be extremely firm with whomever tries to violate the constitution.”
Iraq is home to several Iran-backed militias and paramilitary factions, placing it in an awkward situation amid rising tensions between its two main sponsors, Tehran and Washington.
United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo squarely accused Tehran of being behind Saturday’s operation, saying there was no evidence the “unprecedented attack on the world’s energy supply” was launched from Yemen.
Iraq has called for its territory to be spared any spillover in the standoff between the US and Iran, which has included a series of attacks on shipping in sensitive Gulf waters.
Recent raids on bases belonging to Iraqi Shiite paramilitary groups linked with Iran, attributed to Israel, sparked fears of an escalation.
There have been no military consequences so far, but the strikes have heightened divisions between pro-Tehran and pro-Washington factions in Iraq’s political class.
Baghdad has recently moved to repair ties with Saudi Arabia, a key US ally — much to Iran’s chagrin.
Riyadh recently announced a major border post on the Iraqi frontier would reopen mid-October, after being closed for almost three decades.