Facebook to bring 800 more jobs to London as new office unveiled

Facebook to bring 800 more jobs to London as new office unveiled
A large logo is seen at Facebook’s headquarters in London, Britain, Dec. 4, 2017. (Reuters/Toby Melville)
Updated 05 December 2017

Facebook to bring 800 more jobs to London as new office unveiled

Facebook to bring 800 more jobs to London as new office unveiled

LONDON: Facebook has opened its new London office and said it will create 800 high-tech jobs in the UK over the next year, demonstrating its commitment to the country as it prepares to leave the EU.
The new office will also feature an incubator space called LDN-LAB aimed at supporting UK-based tech startups.
The selected companies will take part in three-month programs where they will work with Facebook experts in areas such as engineering or product development to kickstart their businesses.
“Today’s announcements show that Facebook is more committed than ever to the UK and in supporting the growth of the country’s innovative startups,” said Nicola Mendelsohn, vice-president of Facebook EMEA.
More than 2,300 people are expected to be working for Facebook in the UK by the end of 2018. Over half of those in the London hub will be focused on engineering, ensuring the office will be Facebook’s biggest hub outside of the US.
Facebook’s UK plans will be welcome news to those concerned about London losing its appeal as a technological and financial hub following Brexit.
“It is great to see a world-leading company like Facebook continuing to invest in London’s renowned tech ecosystem, despite the uncertainties surrounding Brexit,” said Julia David, CEO of techUK.
“Large businesses are key to supporting innovation and we are excited to see what becomes of the startups that can grow and scale as a result of this endeavour. The message is clear: London is open, and tech is the flag bearer.”
The office, which opened on Monday, is based at Rathbone Place in London’s West End and is built across 247,000 square-feet and has seven floors.
The opening of the London operations follows the opening of Facebook’s new Middle East HQ in Dubai on Oct. 27. The 20,000-square-foot regional hub is part of the company’s commitment to expanding further into the Middle East and North African markets. The Dubai office has more than 60 employees. Facebook first launched a local presence in the MENA region in 2012 and since then it has grown its regional user base by 264 percent and has around 164 million monthly active people using its site from the region.
“With its strong business ecosystems, regional connectivity, and access to the best global talent, Dubai and the UAE remain the right place for us to call home in the region.
“We are only 1 percent finished in our journey here, and we are excited about what lies ahead in this young, connected, and mobile-first region,” Jonathan Labin, Facebook’s managing director for the Middle East, North Africa and Pakistan, said at the time of the launch.
Staff working in the Dubai office will be able to work from a treadmill desk, take selfies from an “Instagram anti-gravity room” or admire works by Emirati artist Eman Al-Hashemi.


Twitter suspends QAnon-linked Republican lawmaker’s account

Twitter suspends QAnon-linked Republican lawmaker’s account
Updated 18 January 2021

Twitter suspends QAnon-linked Republican lawmaker’s account

Twitter suspends QAnon-linked Republican lawmaker’s account
  • Marjorie Taylor Greene was hit with the 12-hour suspension after she tweeted claims of alleged election fraud in Georgia

WASHINGTON: A newly elected Republican congresswoman known for promoting QAnon conspiracy theories accused Twitter of censorship on Sunday after her account was temporarily suspended for “multiple violations.”
Marjorie Taylor Greene was hit with the 12-hour suspension after she tweeted claims of alleged election fraud in Georgia, her home state.
Twitter flagged at least two tweets as “disputed” and prevented them from being shared or retweeted, saying they carried the “risk of violence.”
The lawmaker’s account was suspended due to “multiple violations of our civic integrity policy,” a Twitter spokesman said.
Greene, an ardent Donald Trump supporter, has echoed his baseless claims of rigging in the 2020 election.
She has also embraced QAnon conspiracy theories in the past and was endorsed by the president as a “future Republican star.”
QAnon followers believe that Trump is waging a secret war against a global liberal cult of Satan-worshipping pedophiles. They have not offered any credible evidence for it.
Greene’s suspension is the latest in a series of high-profile social media bans and lockouts in the wake of the January 6 riot at the US Capitol.
Twitter banned Trump two days after the incident, and since then has scrubbed more than 70,000 accounts with QAnon ties.
Apple and Google have also barred downloads of Parler, a Twitter-like app popular among conservatives, and Amazon has kicked the platform off its servers.
That has outraged many Republicans, who say tech giants are infringing on their free speech.
“Americans’ rights are being stripped away and they aren’t being heard by the people they elected to represent them,” Greene said in a statement after her suspension.
“With Big Tech silencing them, they literally can’t be heard. The censorship has got to stop.”
“If a conservative dares to utter a political opinion that is deemed unapproved by the Internet police they are now subject to false accusations of ‘inciting violence’ simply for having a conservative view,” she added.
Trump last week became the first US president in history to be impeached twice when the House of Representatives voted to charge him with inciting the January 6 mob attack on Congress.