GFH in $150m deal to sell assets to global private schools operator

Updated 05 December 2017
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GFH in $150m deal to sell assets to global private schools operator

LONDON: Gulf-focused investment group GFH has struck a $150 million deal to sell part of its educational assets in the GCC to global private schools operator, Inspired.
GFH’s educational portfolio in the GCC has been built over the past four years and is valued at $300 million, the company said in an announcement on Tuesday. GFH is listed in Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai.
Inspired runs private schools in Europe, Africa, Latin America and Australia. Its chairman Nadin Nsouli said: “This agreement marks the entry point of Inspired in the region. We will evaluate other school acquisitions in the region with GFH.”
Hisham Al-Rayes, CEO of GFH, said: “Inspired’s network and experience will add significant value to the schools including offering both students and teachers opportunities to take part in exchange programs and to benefit from the latest programs to enhance the level of education.”
Inspired has schools in Italy, the UK, Switzerland, Belgium, South Africa, Kenya, Australia, Colombia and Peru. GFH’s businesses include asset management, wealth management, commercial banking and real estate development.
Elsewhere, GEMS MENASA, parent company of Dubai’s largest private schools operator, GEMS Education, was reported to have chosen JP Morgan, Credit Suisse, Bank of America Merrill Lynch and Morgan Stanley to lead a planned flotation in London next year.
GEMS, which operates more than 250 schools across 14 countries, could have a market capitalization of around $4.5-$5 billion, according to Reuters.
Listed on Nasdaq Dubai, GEMS MENSA on Monday reported stronger financial results in the year ending Aug. 31, 2017, with net profit up 2.5% at $129.6 million. Revenue rose 17.3 percent to $926.2m, while key indicator — average revenue per student — jumped 6.6 percent to $8,079 year-on-year.
GEMS also reported it had secured a $1.25 billion loan to refinance existing borrowings and support growth.


Mideast tensions push oil prices toward biggest weekly gain in months

Updated 20 September 2019

Mideast tensions push oil prices toward biggest weekly gain in months

  • Saudi-led coalition launches military operation north of Yemen’s port city of Hodeidah
  • Global markets are also keeping an eye on US-China trade negotiations in Washington

SINGAPORE: Oil prices were on track to jump more than 7 percent this week, their biggest weekly rise in months, as early trading on Friday saw gains extended on fresh Middle East tensions after a key Saudi Arabian supply hub was knocked out in an attack last weekend.
A Saudi-led coalition launched a military operation north of Yemen’s port city of Hodeidah, as the United States worked with Middle East and European nations to build a coalition to deter Iranian threats after the Saudi attack.
Brent crude is on track to rise about 7.7 percent this week, the biggest weekly gain since January. The front-month November contract was at $64.75 a barrel, up 35 cents, by 0532 GMT.
US West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude futures were up 51 cents to $58.64 a barrel, set to post a 7.1 percent gain for the week, the largest weekly rise since June.
“The forward curve remains ‘bid’ as traders are hedging that the initial estimates for the duration of repairs (at damaged Saudi facilities), given the complex nature, could well underestimate the time required,” said Stephen Innes, Asia Pacific market strategist at AxiTrader.
Saudi Arabia’s production dropped by almost half after an attack on Saturday, Sept. 14, crippled a major oil processing facility. Its oil minister has pledged to restore lost production by the end of this month, and bring capacity back to 12 million barrels per day by the end of November.
The United States and Saudi Arabia blame Iran for the assault on Saudi oil facilities. Tehran denies any involvement.
In the United States, meanwhile, torrential rain from Tropical Storm Imelda has forced a major refinery to cut production and to shut a key oil pipeline, terminals and a ship channel in Texas.
Global markets are also keeping an eye on US-China trade negotiations in Washington, as officials from both sides resumed face-to-face talks for the first time in nearly two months on Thursday.