Air New Zealand cancels flights after “events” involving Rolls-Royce engines

Engines on its Boeing 787-9 jets would now require early maintenance, Air New Zealand said in a statement. Above, a Boeing 787 aircraft takes off from Auckland Airport. (Reuters)
Updated 07 December 2017

Air New Zealand cancels flights after “events” involving Rolls-Royce engines

WELLINGTON: Air New Zealand said on Thursday “two recent events” involving Rolls-Royce Holdings Trent 1000 engines had prompted it to cancel and delay some international flights over the coming weeks, making it the latest airline to experience problems.
Engines on its Boeing 787-9 jets would now require early maintenance, it said.
Rolls-Royce told investors in August that 400 to 500 Trent 1000 engines were affected by issues with components wearing out earlier than expected, according to a conference call transcript.
Air New Zealand did not disclose the nature of the two events, but the New Zealand Transport Accident Investigation Commission said it was investigating two events involving “engine abnormalities” on Air New Zealand aircraft this week.
The Aviation Herald reported on Tuesday that an Auckland-Tokyo flight had returned to its base after take-off due to an engine issue, while plane tracking website FlightRadar24 said a flight to Buenos Aires had returned to Auckland on Wednesday.
Japan’s ANA Holdings and Britain’s Virgin Atlantic have also reported issues with the engines over the last 18 months.
Air New Zealand said Rolls-Royce did not have spare engines available while the maintenance work was being undertaken, meaning it would be focused on finding replacement aircraft capacity.
Rolls-Royce said it was working with Air New Zealand to minimize disruption and restore full flight operations as soon as possible.
“It’s not uncommon for long-term engine programs to experience technical issues during their life and we manage them through proactive maintenance,” a Rolls-Royce spokeswoman said.
Air New Zealand said it did not anticipate any change to current earnings guidance at this stage.


Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

“I always think success is married with passion,” Simon Lowden said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him
Updated 49 min 19 sec ago

Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

  • Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

RIYADH: The key to success is being passionate about what you do, Simon Lowden, chief sustainability officer at PepsiCo, told a brainstorming session at the Misk Global Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday.

“I always think success is married with passion,” he said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him.

“I started my life in a small farming village, went to London to attend university, joined PepsiCo … and now I run our sustainability agenda,” he said. “This made me rich as a person, and I did things I really enjoyed.”

Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

Other panelists included Dave Brooke, vice president of client solutions at Dell Technologies; Kevin Gaskell, an international speaker on leadership and business performance; Deloitte CEO David Sproul; and Nancy Yammout, general director of the NGO Rescue Me. The session was moderated by Lebanese journalist and politician Naufal Daou.