Revenue per available room of Jeddah hotels in November lowest in a decade

Above, the Jeddah Hilton hotel. STR said Jeddah hotels’ RevPAR was pegged at SR321.06 in November, 25.4 percent lower from a year ago. (Courtesy Jeddah Hilton)
Updated 13 December 2017

Revenue per available room of Jeddah hotels in November lowest in a decade

DUBAI: The revenue per available room (RevPAR) of Jeddah hotels last month was the lowest for a November since 2007, industry monitor STR said in its preliminary report yesterday.
RevPAR, arguably the most important of all ratios used in the hotel industry, is derived by multiplying a hotel’s average daily room rate (ADR) by its occupancy rate. The performance metric provides a snapshot of a hotel’s business performance by incorporating room rates and occupancy levels.
STR said Jeddah hotels’ RevPAR was pegged at SR321.06 in November, 25.4 percent lower from a year ago and 26.9 percent lower from SR439.60 a month earlier.
“Preliminary November 2017 data for hotels in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, indicate significant supply growth and steep performance declines,” STR said.
Among other industry indicators, the occupancy rates in Jeddah hotels was 17.4 percent lower to 45.7 percent while average daily rate during the month was down 9.7 percent year-on-year to SR702.62.
Hotel room supply was up 9.8 percent in November, but demand went down 9.3 percent, STR noted.
The property consultancy JLL in its previous report said that a potential 900 keys could be available by the end of this year with some hotel projects scheduled to be completed, including the 445-room Hotel Galleria By Elaf.
“Over the next two years, a number of midscale hotels are also expected to open under the Ibis and Premier Inn brands,” JLL said.
“The diversification of the hotel market will make Jeddah a more attracted place to visit to broader range of visitors.
The Saudi government recently launched a multi-billion project that aims to develop 34,000 square kilometers of the Red Sea coastline and 50 reef-fringed islands into luxury resorts and luxury residences.
Construction is scheduled to begin in 2019, with the first phase of the project set to be completed by 2022.


Saudi Arabia looks to cut spending in bid to shrink deficit

Updated 16 min 16 sec ago

Saudi Arabia looks to cut spending in bid to shrink deficit

  • Saudi Arabia has issued about SR84 billion in sukuk in the year to date

LONDON: Saudi Arabia plans to reduce spending next year by about 7.5 percent to SR990 billion ($263.9 billion) as it seeks to reduce its deficit. This compares to spending of SR1.07 trillion this year, it said in a preliminary budget statement.

The Kingdom anticipates a budget deficit of about 12 percent this year falling to 5.1 percent next year.

Saudi Arabia released data on Wednesday showing that the economy contracted by about 7 percent in the second quarter as regional economies faced the twin blow of the coronavirus pandemic and continued oil price weakness.

The unemployment rate among Saudis increased to 15.4 percent in the second quarter compared with 11.8 percent in the first quarter of the year.

The challenging headwinds facing regional economies is expected to spur activity across debt markets as countries sell bonds to help fund spending.

Saudi Arabia has already issued about SR84 billion in sukuk in the year to date.

“Over the past three years, the government has developed (from scratch) a well-functioning and increasingly deeper domestic sukuk market that has allowed it to tap into growing domestic and international demand for Shariah-compliant fixed income assets,” Moody’s said in a statement on Wednesday. 

“This, in turn, has helped diversify its funding sources compared with what was available during the oil price shock of 2015-16 and ease liquidity pressures amid a more than doubling of government financing needs this year,” the ratings agency added.