Exposed: How Houthi militias are killing off Yemen media

A Houthi militant takes part in a parade in Sanaa, Yemen, in this December 19, 2017 photo. (REUTERS)
Updated 26 December 2017

Exposed: How Houthi militias are killing off Yemen media

ADEN: Iran-backed Houthi militias were accused on Monday of an unprecedented campaign of violence, intimidation, abduction and murder aimed at journalists and the media in Yemen.
At least 26 journalists have been killed since the Houthi coup in 2014, said Women Journalists Without Chains, a civil rights group in Yemen.
The Houthis are also guilty of attempted murder, abduction, torture, threats, assaults, looting of property, the abduction of relatives, the use of journalists as human shields, closing newspapers and TV channels and blocking websites, the Yemeni Journalists Syndicate said.
Eighteen journalists are still in Houthi custody, and denied their right to medical treatment, the syndicate said. They include nine journalists arrested while working in Sanaa in June 2016, who remain detained. They are being tortured, their families are not permitted to visit them, and they are not allowed medical treatment. Yemen’s Minister of Information, Moammar Al-Eryani, said that before the Houthi coup Yemen had 17 daily newspapers, 155 weeklies, 26 monthlies, and other publications. There were also four official TV channels and 15 private ones. By 2015 there were only 15 newspapers and two official TV channels, the minister said.
A UN report in August said the Houthis had carried out a campaign of intimidation, arbitrary detention, forced disappearance and murder against activists, journalists and members of civil society. They had shut down 21 websites and seven TV channels, banned the publication of 18 newspapers, raided buildings and attacked 52 civil society and human rights organizations, the UN said.
The Houthis targeted all media institutions and their staff, and confiscated their equipment, and the legitimate government and its supporters no longer had any influence in areas controlled by the militias.
In March 2016, photographer Mohammed Al-Yamani was shot dead and four of his colleagues were wounded when Houthi snipers opened fire on journalists covering the fighting in Taiz.


Iranian hard-liners in parliament reject president’s nominee

Updated 12 August 2020

Iranian hard-liners in parliament reject president’s nominee

  • According to the parliament’s website, lawmakers rejected Hossein Modares Khiabani’s nomination for minister of trade and industries
  • Parliament Speaker Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf said the vote was 140-104 against the nominee

TEHRAN, Iran: Iranian hard-liners in parliament on Wednesday voted against President Hassan Rouhani’s nominee for trade minister in the first showdown between the rival camps since the house resumed work in May despite the struggles to curb the spread of the coronavirus.
According to the parliament’s website, lawmakers rejected Hossein Modares Khiabani’s nomination for minister of trade and industries.
Parliament Speaker Mohammad Bagher Ghalibaf said the vote was 140-104 against the nominee. There were 254 lawmakers at the session and 10 abstained. The parliament has 290 seats.
The vote marked the first serious confrontation between the newly elected house, dominated by conservatives and the bloc of supporters of the relatively moderate Rouhani. Under the law, Rouhani must introduce new nominees to his Cabinet in the next three months.
Rouhani in May dismissed the trade and industry minister at the time, Reza Rahmani, as Iran faced an unprecedented economic downturn amid intense pressure from the United States after President Donald Trump pulled America out of Iran’s nuclear with world powers and reimposed sanctions on the country. Khiabani, 52, had since been the acting trade minister.
Iran is also grappling with the largest and deadliest outbreak of the coronavirus in the Middle East, with more than 331,000 confirmed cases and at least 18,800 deaths.