Jeddah airport: Drastic changes expected in employment of women

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Courtesy: (Saudi Ground Services Co.)
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With the opening of the new Jeddah airport in May 2018, many expect that drastic changes will take place in the employment of a large number of women in different positions. (SPA)
Updated 31 December 2017

Jeddah airport: Drastic changes expected in employment of women

RIYADH: The Saudi Ground Services Co. (SGS), which specializes in providing logistic support for aircraft, featured on its Snapchat account a video in which women are seen attending a training session. The video shows instructors motivating the young women and speaking about the courses they have taken to guide them into their new roles as ground service technicians.
The question remains when and where women will be employed at the airport. “Female uniforms have been distributed: A dark grey abaya with green lines, similar to that of male colleagues who wear the same color uniforms,” said Nawras Usamah, an airport employee.
With the opening of the new Jeddah airport in May 2018, many expect that drastic changes will take place in the employment of a large number of women in different positions. They will mark a new era and perhaps a more open approach that will greet guests of the city known as the gateway of the Two Holy Mosques.
“In the beginning, ladies will work at the counters and places at the airport that don’t require challenging physical efforts,” said Nawras.
In line with Vision 2030, many companies in Saudi Arabia are employing females in high numbers and anticipating a large turnout of future applicants.
“Last year we employed more than 100 ladies in the management section, and we expect that number to double the following year,” said Mohammed bin Yassin, who works at the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA). “Our position is strongly leaning toward employing females in aviation.”


Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

Updated 17 min 33 sec ago

Saudi tourism megaproject aims to turn the Red Sea green

  • Development will protect endangered hawksbill turtle, while coral research could help save the Great Barrier Reef

RIYADH: Key ecological targets are driving Saudi Arabia’s Red Sea tourism megaproject, its leader has told Arab News.

The development will not only protect the habitat of the endangered hawksbill turtle, but could also save coral reefs that are dying elsewhere in the world, said Red Sea Development Company Chief Executive John Pagano.

The project is taking shape in a 28,000 square kilometer region of lagoons, archipelagos, canyons and volcanic geology between the small towns of Al-Wajh and Umluj on the Kingdom’s west coast.

One island, Al-Waqqadi, looked like the perfect tourism destination, but was discovered to be a breeding ground for the hawksbill. “In the end, we said we’re not going to develop it. It shows you can balance development and conservation,” Pagano said.

Scientists are also working to explain why the area’s coral reef system — fourth-largest in the world —  is thriving when others around the world are endangered.

“To the extent we solve that mystery, the ambition would be to export that to the rest of the world,” Pagano said. “Can we help save the Great Barrier Reef or the Caribbean coral that has been severely damaged?”

 

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