Saudi attorney general: 11 princes arrested for refusing to pay utility bills

A battalion of the Saudi Royal Guard arrested 11 princes who gathered at the Riyadh Ruling Palace after a royal order was issued for their arrest following their refusal to leave the palace. Qassar Al-Hokum (Ruling Palace) main Hall in Riyadh.
Updated 08 January 2018

Saudi attorney general: 11 princes arrested for refusing to pay utility bills

JEDDAH: Eleven Saudi princes who gathered at the Government Palace demanding the cancellation of the royal decree on the suspension of the payment of electricity and water bills by the royals were arrested, Attorney General Sheikh Saud Al-Mujib said in a statement on Saturday.
“The princes also demanded financial compensation for the death sentence against one of their cousins. They were informed of their wrong approach, but they refused to leave the site. A royal directive was issued to arrest them and they were sent to Al-Hair prison, pending trial,” said the statement.
“We emphasize here that the royal directives are clear that all citizens are equal before the law, and those who fail to abide by the regulations and instructions will be held accountable whoever they are,” said the statement.
The statement confirms earlier reports carried by local online newspaper Sabq. The website has reported that a battalion of the Saudi Royal Guard arrested 11 princes who gathered at the Riyadh Ruling Palace for the same reasons that were later mentioned in the attorney general’s statement.
After being informed that their demands to be exempted from paying the bills were rejected, the princes refused to leave the palace and, hence, the Royal Guard was ordered to intervene and detain them.
Ever since King Salman ascended to the throne in 2015, he has introduced measures that ensured that members of the royal family are held equally accountable before the law.
He approved of the beheading of a prince who killed a member of the public.
In a TV interview, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman — who is credited with the Kingdom’s ambitious Vision 2030 — made it clear that the country’s reform plans will not tolerate corruption, nor will they allow anyone, regardless of their status or position, to receive a special treatment when it comes to paying utility bills.
 


Houthis, Iran condemned over new drone attacks on KSA

Updated 26 October 2020

Houthis, Iran condemned over new drone attacks on KSA

  • One civilian injured by shrapnel after Saudi-led coalition intercepts four flying bombs launched from Yemen

JEDDAH: Houthi militias and their Iranian backers were condemned on Sunday after the Saudi-led coalition intercepted four explosive-laden drones in two attacks launched from Yemen targeting the south of the Kingdom.

Three of the drones were destroyed early on Saturday and a fourth on Sunday. Shrapnel that fell in Sarat Abidah governorate injured a civilian, and damaged five homes and three vehicles, said civil defense spokesman Capt. Mohammed Abdu Al-Sayed.

Iran was increasing its support to the Houthis to undermine efforts for peace, Dr. Hamdan Al-Shehri, the political analyst and international relations scholar, told Arab News.

“They want the Houthis to sabotage all they can in Saudi Arabia, regardless of whether their target is a populated area, oil facilities or even a sacred place. This adds tension to the area, and that is what Iran is working on.”

Iranians want the Houthis to sabotage all they can in Saudi Arabia, regardless of whether their target is a populated area, oil facilities or even a sacred place. This adds tension to the area, and that is what Iran is working on.

Dr. Hamdan Al-Shehri, political analyst and international relations scholar

Al-Shehri said the situation in Yemen would remain the same unless the legitimate government was returned to Yemen, Security Council Resolution 2216 was put into practice and the Houthi militia were removed.

“Without these things, the Yemen crisis will not end and the whole region will remain in tension.”

The Houthis did not differentiate between military sites and civilian locations, he said.

“Their objective is to damage all places they can reach in Saudi Arabia, and their latest attempts to attack a populated area are nothing new.

“They have also targeted airports and some Aramco oil facilities. If the Aramco attack had not been contained, the damage would have affected the whole Eastern region. They have also attempted to target Makkah, where pilgrims and worshippers were performing their rituals.

“They don’t care. If you look back at what the Revolutionary Guards did at the Grand Mosque, you will realize it is not strange that the Houthis are trying to destroy everything in Saudi Arabia. The strange thing is the silence of the world toward what is happening.”