Project to employ 10,000 young men, women launched in Riyadh

Riyadh Gov. Prince Faisal bin Bandar speaks to media in Riyadh on Wednesday. (SPA)
Updated 01 February 2018

Project to employ 10,000 young men, women launched in Riyadh

RIYADH: Riyadh Gov. Prince Faisal bin Bandar launched a project on Wednesday to provide 10,000 jobs for young men and women in the capital and give self-help loans totaling SR11 million ($2.9 million) to unemployed youths.
Prince Mohammed bin Abdulrahman bin Abdul Aziz, deputy governor of the Riyadh region, and Prince Faisal bin Abdulrahman bin Abdul Aziz, chairman of the board of directors of the Association of Development and Financing of Productive Families in Riyadh, also attended the event.
Prince Faisal bin Abdulrahman announced the launch of more than 10,000 jobs for young men and women with the signing of 27 agreements with private-sector companies and the provision of loans to 180 young men and women with a total value of more than SR11 million.
He also announced the launch of the Prince Abdulrahman bin Abdul Aziz center for training and employment.
Saleh Al-Yousef, director general of Ensan Charity Committee for Orphans Care, launched a project called Ijdah, which will help Saudi male and female youths to gain skills for employment in the local market. Yousef said that some 6,000 young men and women will be trained under the program.
The governor signed several agreements including with Dr. Sulaiman Al-Habib Hospital to train and employ 1,055 beneficiaries, Riyadh United factory to employ 30 beneficiaries, as well as the Innovative Foods Company to train and employ 200 youths, and with the dates factory in Zulfi to enable 200 beneficiaries.
Saudi journalist, Musad Al-Zayani, who is based in Dubai, told Arab News that this was the need of the hour, and the projects would create a brighter future for youths who were going to be employed in various sectors in private establishments. “I am happier since they will be trained properly to suit their vocations and to get better outputs,” he said.


Uthman Taha: ‘I wish the verses about heaven would never end’

Taha is the official calligrapher of the Qur’an at the King Fahd Complex for the Printing of the Holy Qur’an in Madinah. The 86-year-old is still in the recovery phase, his wife said, and has been advised to rest and to avoid stress. (Supplied)
Updated 15 August 2020

Uthman Taha: ‘I wish the verses about heaven would never end’

  • The Syrian Qur’an writer, regarded as one of the world’s finest calligraphers, is on the road to recovery following his recent hospital admission

MAKKAH: Syrian calligrapher Uthman Taha is in good health and recovering at home after a 13-day stay in a hospital where he was treated for what he and his wife initially suspected to be the novel coronavirus COVID-19, although he ultimately tested negative for the virus.

Taha is the official calligrapher of the Qur’an at the King Fahd Complex for the Printing of the Holy Qur’an in Madinah. His wife, Fatimah Umm Al-Nour, said Taha had a chest infection during his stay at the hospital and stressed that he had been “careful and took all the precautionary measures” and that he had not left the house for five months before his hospital visit.
The 86-year-old calligrapher is still in the recovery phase, his wife said, and has been advised to rest and to avoid stress. She praised his doctors, who have consistently checked in with the couple since Taha returned home, and added that she has tested negative for COVID-19 too.
Taha is regarded as one of the most skilled calligraphers in the Arab world. Al-Nour told Arab News that he continues to practice calligraphy daily.
Taha, who has written the Qur’an 12 times at the King Fahd Complex, was born in 1934 and attended school in Aleppo. His father was also a skilled calligrapher, who used the Ruq’ah script, and Taha studied with several of Syria’s finest calligraphers including Mohammed Al-Mawlawi, Mohammed Al-Khatib, Hussein Al-Turki, and Ibrahim Al-Rifai.
When he moved to Damascus for university, Taha began to learn other scripts, including Thuluth, Naskh (in which he is now considered a master), and Farsi. He received his calligraphy certificate from master calligrapher Hamed Al-Amadi in 1973.
He arrived in Saudi Arabia in 1988, and began work as a calligrapher at the King Fahd Complex for the Printing of the Holy Qur’an in Madinah. He writes the Qur’an in the Ottoman script, and copies of his work have been distributed throughout the Islamic world.
What makes Taha’s work unique is that each page of the Qur’an that he writes concludes at the end of a verse. The secret, he explains, is to simplify the words — which is the origin of the Kufic script in which the Qur’an has been written since the days of Prophet Muhammad’s companions — keeping the letters close to one another.
Taha spent years perfecting his technique of evenly distributing the words in every line so that the space between the lettering is consistent throughout every page of every book, which means eliminating many of the script combinations that make such consistency difficult.
He explained to Arab News that when he is working on his Qur’an calligraphy he is transported: “When I begin writing the Holy Qur’an, I resort to solitude to allow myself to be invested in the verses and their interpretation, forgetting about the world around me,” he said. “I wish the verses about Jannah (heaven) would never end, and my hand trembles when I write the verses about Jahannam (hell).”