Fashion show spotlights traditional Saudi attire

A model displays a southern headpiece made of jasmines that are worn by brides on their wedding day.
Updated 08 February 2018

Fashion show spotlights traditional Saudi attire

RIYADH: A fashion show just for women at the King Abdul Aziz Foundation on Monday showcased traditional regional clothing from around the Kingdom.
The National Heritage Society event showed off traditional Saudi clothing in a unique modern form with Saudi models wearing each region’s different attire.
A model strutting down the runway in a red dress embroidered in gold opened the show. She was covered from head to toe, with only her eyes showing. From then on, a rainbow of colors swirled down the runway.
The event, attended by Princess Nouf bint Faisal bin Turki and sponsored by Arabian Centers, took place outdoors, with oud music playing in the background. White chairs and tables lined the spotlit runway. Guests sat amid tall palm trees, and the sound of laughter and chattering filled the air.
Rotana TV covered the event, which was hosted by presenter Roaa Rayan, dressed in a traditional Saudi jalabiya.
Young Saudi women proudly showcased their dresses on the runway. Each model wore a garment from a different region in the Kingdom, representing its heritage.
There were many stands selling clothing. One of the participants was Bin Ghaith Textiles, a prominent Riyadh establishment since the days of King Saud, selling traditional textiles and clothes.
“Sofrat Saud is a well-known textile that has been worn since the days of King Saud; it was brought from India and since then, worn in weddings,” said Al-Jazi Bin Ghaith, the great granddaughter of the founder.
An attendee exclaimed: “Look at how beautiful our clothes were — vibrant colorful and most of all sleek. No woman could possibly look bad in these dresses.”
Layla Al-Bassam, a teacher at the Princess Nourah University, is an advocate of traditional clothing without modern touches. She showcased some of her traditional Saudi designs. She said that today’s show is unique: “We will see the clothing of brides of the Kingdom of all regions.”
Basma Al-Nowaisher, director of activities and events at the National Heritage Society, explained that the event aimed to promote the Kingdom’s traditions and preserve them.


Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

Updated 06 June 2020

Worshippers flock to reopened Prophet’s Mosque for Friday prayers

MADINAH: Hundreds of thousands of worshippers attended the first Friday prayers to be held at the Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah since the gatherings were suspended to stop the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak.

The green light for the resumption of the prayer meetings came as part of a plan to gradually reopen the Kingdom’s mosques while ensuring worshippers and visitors adhered to preventive measures.

A ban on access to the Rawdah remained in place and only groups of worshippers numbering up to a maximum of 40 percent of the mosque’s capacity were being allowed entry.

Precautionary measures also included the allocation of specific doors for the entry of worshippers, the installation of thermal cameras, removal of all carpets so that prayers could be performed on the marble, sanitization of the mosque’s floors and courtyards, periodic opening of domes and canopies to ventilate the mosque, and the removal of Zamzam water containers.

The Prophet’s Mosque in Madinah will be closed after evening prayers and reopened one hour before dawn prayers. Parking lots will operate at 50 percent capacity and a media awareness campaign has been launched to highlight safety procedures at the holy site.

Medical teams have also been stationed at the main entrances to the mosque in cooperation with the Ministry of Health.

Elsewhere in the Kingdom, worshippers also flocked to perform Friday prayers at mosques amid strict health measures.

On May 31, Saudi authorities reopened all mosques for prayers, except in Makkah, as part of the Kingdom’s plan for a gradual return to normal life.

Last week the minister of Islamic affairs, dawah and guidance said that the country’s mosques were ready to welcome back worshippers, following his field trips to check that necessary preparations had been made.

All worshippers must still maintain a distance of 2 meters between rows, wear masks to enter a mosque, and Friday sermons and prayers have been limited to a maximum of 15 minutes.