Saudi Art Council exhibition presents 'Jina Min Al-Taif'

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A man showcases his calligraphy at the art exhibition. (AN Photo)
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Drums can be seen at the art exhibition. (AN Photo)
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The event shed light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality. (AN Photo)
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The event shed light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality. (AN Photo)
Updated 24 February 2018

Saudi Art Council exhibition presents 'Jina Min Al-Taif'

JEDDAH: The 21,39 art exhibition turned the old, abandoned corners of the Pepsi Co. factory into a spectacular work of art through the sounds and colors of Taif’s rich culture on Friday. The event was to bring people together to celebrate and learn about the city.
“For us, old and abandoned is exactly what the Saudi Art Council looks for when it comes to activating and creating exhibitions because it may be dead for most people, but for us there is so much history here, and to have people come and visit is a rare opportunity,” Nada Sheikh-Yasin, manager at the Art Council, told Arab News when asked about the reason for choosing the location.
She explained that the event is new, and it is the last day the Pepsi Co. factory will hold an art exhibition.
The event sheds light on the history as well as the culture of Taif in different forms of art, from music and calligraphy to photography and virtual reality.
Locals and expatriates all gathered at the site to witness the event. “I think it’s a great event. We started off at the Saudi Art Council in Gold Moore, then came here tonight. It looks interesting and I highly recommend that everybody attends,” said Nati Marvidis, who attended the exhibition.
The event took off to the beautiful sound of the Oud (musical instrument), through the live performance of Sa’ad Al-Atif and his group. People enjoyed the music very much, clapped their hands, sang along and expressed their affiliation with Taif’s heritage.
Artist Sa’ad Al-Atif explained that the sound of Taif’s music is different from any other musical sound in the Kingdom. It has sounds specific to the city of Taif.
Taghreed Wazna, photographer and attendee, said: “It is the first time we have an event dedicated to the people of Taif, their culture, tradition and lifestyle. The rose factory was presented in a new and creative way by artist Hassan Mabrook. Many people here in Jeddah have no knowledge of the rose factory, and how they make rosewater and rose oil.”
She added: ”I have also discovered amazing photographs taken by photographers from the Association for Culture and Arts in Taif. This event taught me so much about Taif’s architecture, buildings, traditional music and dances.
“I would like to thank the Saudi Art Council for cooperating with the Association for Culture and Arts in Taif and their manager, artist Faisal Al-Khudaidi,” said Wazna.


Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

Updated 16 September 2019

Houthi attack on Saudi Aramco facilities act of terror: Japanese defense minister

TOKYO: Taro Kono, the defense minister of Japan, said that threats to his country’s oil supply was the “most worrying scenario” he could imagine in international relations, in the wake of attacks on Saudi Arabian oil production facilities. 

“The most pessimistic scenario right now is that something happens in the Straits of Hormuz and the oil supply gets cut down, and that would send a shock wave through the global economy. I think the price of oil is already rising after this attack on Saudi facilities, so that’s the most worrying scenario right now,” he told a conference in Tokyo, Japan.

However, speaking on the sidelines to Arab News, he insisted that Saudi Arabia would remain a reliable partner of Japan - which imports around 40 per cent of its crude from the Kingdom - and downplayed concerns about long-term supply problems.

“Saudi has been and will be an important source of our energy supply. We have international co-ordination, and we have reserves, so we are not really worried about that,” he said. 

Kono, who was until recently Japan’s foreign minister, said that his country would be seeking to promote diplomatic solutions to the latest Middle East conflagration. "We definitely need to ease the tension between those countries. As Foreign Minister, the last thing I was doing was calling the Iranian Foreign Minister and the French Foreign Minister to ease the tension the region through diplomatic actions, and I think it's important to continue doing it.

“This Houthi attack on Saudi is a little different, because it's a terrorist attack. I think we may require some kind of military operation against those drone attacks, and that's something out of Japan's constitutional boundary. I think Japan will be focusing on diplomatic efforts in easing tension in the region.”

He raised concerns about the apparent lack of sophistication in the recent attacks. “If it is really drones, that is a lot cheaper than any form of conventional missile,” he said.