North Korean athletes arrive in the South for Paralympics

North Korean athletes arrive to participate in the 2018 Pyeongchang Paralympic Games at the Korean-transit office near the Demilitarized Zone in Paju on March 7, 2018. (Ahn Young-joon/POOL/AFP)
Updated 07 March 2018

North Korean athletes arrive in the South for Paralympics

PYEONGCHANG, South Korea: North Korean athletes and delegates arrived in the South Wednesday to take part in the Winter Paralympics, as part of an Olympics-driven detente between the two neighbors.
Two competitors — both of them taking part in cross-country skiing — along with four observer athletes and 18 officials crossed the land border north of Seoul before heading for the venues.
Their journey came a day after Seoul announced plans to hold a historic summit between the North’s leader Kim Jong Un and the South’s President Moon Jae-in — the latest fruit of their Olympics-fueled diplomacy.
Moon sought to use the February 9-25 Pyeongchang Winter Games to try to broker dialogue between Washington and Pyongyang in a bid to ease the nuclear standoff between them.
The North mounted a charm offensive by sending hundreds of cheerleaders and Kim’s sister to the opening ceremony of the Games, during which athletes from the two Koreas marched together under a neutral “unification flag.”
Seoul responded by sending Moon’s special envoys — including his spy chief — to Pyongyang this week, where leader Kim told them he was willing to discuss denuclearization with the US.
The North Korean athletes — Kim Jong Hyon and Ma Yu Chol — may march with their counterparts from the South during Friday’s opening ceremony for the Paralympics, which run until March 18.
The pair made their international debuts in a tournament in January in Oberried, Germany.
It is the first time the North, which has often faced criticism for its cruel treatment of disabled people, has taken part in the Winter Paralympics.
Pyongyang had previously sent athletes to the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London and the 2016 edition of the games in Rio.
Craig Spence, a spokesman for the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), said the athletes had been given “bipartite” slots for the games, meaning they had not been able to meet the full qualification criteria.
“They have bipartite invitations from us due to their circumstances. They have not been traveling around the world and have not been able to take part in all the qualifying events,” he told AFP.


Formula One comes back to the track with Aramco as sponsors amid new coronavirus lockdown era

Updated 47 min 14 sec ago

Formula One comes back to the track with Aramco as sponsors amid new coronavirus lockdown era

  • The return to the track for F1 will also mark a first for Saudi Aramco that are sponsoring the global event
  • Lando Norris secured a career-best fourth place on the grid for McLaren for the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix

DUBAI: Sunday will see the return of Formula One with the first race of the season since the coronavirus pandemic hit the world and closed the sport down.

The return to the track for F1 will also mark a first for Saudi Aramco that are sponsoring the global event.

“We are thrilled to be sponsoring Formula 1. Millions of people around the world saw Aramco’s branding along the racing circuit today for the first time,” read a statement from the Saudi oil giant.

“As the world’s largest energy supplier and an innovation leader, our ambition is to find game-changing solutions for better, more efficiently performing engines and cleaner energy. Partnerships such as this are important to help us to deliver this goal.”

 

Video courtesy of Aramco 

Lando Norris secured a career-best fourth place on the grid for McLaren for the season-opening Austrian Grand Prix and admitted he had exceeded his own expectations.
The 20-year-old Briton qualified behind the pace-setting Mercedes pairing of pole sitter Valtteri Bottas and six-time champion Lewis Hamilton and Red Bull's Max Verstappen, but ahead of both Ferraris and other strong rivals including Racing Point's speedy ‘pink Mercedes’ cars.
“We had our expectations of where we thought we wanted to be and from the very beginning the Racing Points have clearly been extremely quick,” said Norris, who is embarking on his second F1 season.
“We never thought we’d be in a chance of beating them or getting close to them so we are delighted with this and with the car performance.
“The car started to come alive and feel better and better as it went to lower fuel levels and this track was very good for us last year. So we have confidence in the car and feel it suits us at the moment.
“Hopefully, the race goes well and we have two (consecutive) weekends of this and, hopefully, we can repeat it as well.”
Norris will start the race - his and the sport’s first F1 race for 216 days - alongside Verstappen with Alex Albon in the second Red Bull and Racing Point's Sergio Perez behind him.
His Ferrari-bound McLaren team-mate Carlos Sainz qualified eighth.

(With AFP)