Aramco is cleanest supplier of oil to China, US research finds

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Saudi Aramco’s Manifa oilfield. The national oil company is China’s cleanest supplier of crude, the annual CERAWeek energy conference in Houston heard. (Reuters)
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Saudi Aramco CEO Amin Nasser speaks at the annual CERAWeek energy conference in Houston where it was revealed that the national oil company was China’s cleanest crude supplier. (Reuters)
Updated 08 March 2018

Aramco is cleanest supplier of oil to China, US research finds

HOUSTON: Saudi Aramco supplies the environmentally cleanest oil to China, the biggest energy consumer in the world, according to a recent scientific study.
A research paper by Nature Energy, a publication of Stanford University in the US, compared the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from 13 big oil producers that shipped crude oil to China.
The results showed that Saudi crude had the lowest average carbon intensity when processed and used by Chinese industry, meaning that it produced fewer environmentally harmful emissions than other suppliers.
Venezuela sold China the “dirtiest” oil, according to the study, followed by Iran and Iraq, the researchers found.
Oil industry experts said that the findings reflect not only the higher quality of Saudi crude, but also the efficiency of the technology used to get the crude from reservoirs to shipment.
The study was highlighted at the CERAWeek by IHS Markit event in Houston, Texas. Amin Nasser, chief executive of Saudi Aramco, said: “Not all crudes are equal, and (the research shows that) Saudi Arabia has among the lowest carbon intensities of crude production in the world.”
The researchers said: “Oilfields in Saudi Arabia showed the lowest average GHG intensities due to highly productive reservoirs (high productivity index), low water production (leads to lower mass lifted and less energy expenditure in separation per unit of oil extracted) and low flaring rates.”
Ahmad Al-Khowaiter, Aramco’s chief technology officer, said that the findings showed the value of the big research and development program that the Saudi national oil company has made one of its main business priorities.
“It is good business, not just good environmental practice. We are the lowest cost producer, and the lowest emissions producer. It will help achieve sustainability through greater energy efficiency,” he said.
China is the biggest oil consumer in the world, but is also a major environmental polluter, mainly because it continues to use local coal as its main energy source.
The CERAWeek event has sought to understand the country’s new attitude toward the environment, dubbed “making China skies blue again” by the government.
Mikael Höök, an energy scientist at Sweden’s Uppsala University, said: “Documenting the emissions and net energy of a crude supply could be essential to meeting national emission and energy security targets.
“The data presented by Nature Energy indicates that the impact of replacing or phasing out just the most carbon-intensive 10 percent of Chinese oil imports could be significant — not just for continuing climate-informed energy strategies but also for geopolitical and energy security reasons, such as avoiding potentially risky suppliers in regions with security concerns.
“Improved understanding of Chinese oil policies and import preferences are, therefore, vital for modeling emission trends on local and global scales with a nuance that can inform policy realistically,” he said.


Aramco profits fall in tough quarter, but sees partial recovery from COVID-19 impact

Updated 52 min 12 sec ago

Aramco profits fall in tough quarter, but sees partial recovery from COVID-19 impact

  • Aramco see’s “partial recovery” from pandemic impact
  • Aramco president says company remains resilient

DUBAI: Saudi Aramco, the world’s biggest oil company, reported a net income of $6.57bn for the second quarter of 2020, the period which witnessed the most volatile oil market conditions for many decades.

The result, announced to the Tadawul stock exchange in Riyadh where the shares are listed, compared with income of $24.7 bn last year.

Amin Nasser, president and chief executive, said: “Despite COVID-19 bringing the world to a standstill, Aramco kept going. We have proven our financial resilience and operational reliability, setting a record in our business operations, while at the same time taking steps to ensure the health and safety of our people.”

Aramco’s dividend - a big attraction for the investors who bought into the world’s biggest initial public offering last year - will remain as pledged, Nasser added. Cash flow in the quarter amounted to $6.106 bn.

““Strong headwinds from reduced demand and lower oil prices are reflected in our second quarter results. Yet we delivered solid earnings because of our low production costs, unique scale, agile workforce, and unrivalled financial and operational strength. This helped us deliver on our plan to maintain a second quarter dividend of $18.75 billion to be paid in the third quarter,” he said.

Aramco said the loss was “mainly reflecting the impact of lower crude oil prices and declining refining and chemicals margins, partly offset by a decrease in production royalties resulting from lower crude oil prices and a decrease in the royalty rate from 20 per cent to 15 per cent, lower income taxes and zakat as a result of lower earnings, and higher other income related to sales for gas products.”

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Sales and revenue in the period - which saw oil prices collapse on “Black Monday” in April - fell 57 per cent to $32.861 bn from the comparable period last year. 

Nasser said he was cautiously optimistic that the world economy was slowly recovering from the depths of the pandemic lockdowns.

“We are seeing a partial recovery in the energy market as countries around the world take steps to ease restrictions and reboot their economies. Meanwhile, we continue to place people’s safety first and have adapted to the new normal, implementing wide-ranging precautions to limit the spread of COVID-19 wherever we operate.

“We are determined to emerge from the pandemic stronger and will continue making progress on our long-term strategic journey, through ongoing investments in our business – which has one of the lowest upstream carbon footprints in the world,” he added.

Aramco expects capital expenditure to be at the lower end of the $25bn to $30bn range it has already indicated for this year.