Angola to launch big oil block under shadow of OPEC cuts

The Kaombo Norte floating production, storage and offloading vessel can pump 115,000 barrels per day, half the oil block’s eventual production. (Courtesy Total)
Updated 09 March 2018

Angola to launch big oil block under shadow of OPEC cuts

LONDON: The first vessel that will pump and store oil for Angola’s 230,000 barrels per day (bpd) Kaombo project is en route to the West African nation, operator Total said.
The Kaombo oil block will produce its first oil this summer, Total said on Thursday. Once it is fully up and running, it will add roughly 14 percent to the OPEC member’s average 2017 output of 1.632 million bpd.
The Kaombo Norte floating production, storage and offloading (FPSO) vessel left Singapore earlier this week, Total said. It can pump 115,000 bpd, half the oil block’s eventual production.
The $16 billion offshore project will add a significant amount of oil to Africa’s number two exporter at a time when it is bound by output limits under a deal orchestrated by the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries.
A source close to the project said the block was expected to pump roughly 100,000 bpd by August.
Another FPSO, Kaombo Sul, is still in Singapore.
OPEC is reducing output by roughly 1.2 million bpd as part of a deal with Russia and other producers that began in January 2017 and was extended until the end of 2018.
So far, Angola has complied comfortably, pumping even less than the maximum agreed. Last month, its output of 1.6 million bpd amounted to 194 percent of compliance with promised cuts of 78,000 bpd.
Declining production at mature fields has cut into Angola’s output, but the Kaombo addition could complicate efforts to maintain compliance.
Angola’s state oil company Sonangol has said production will be roughly steady this year, and the above-target cuts earlier in the year could keep its average compliance for the year within OPEC’s limits.
Longer term, Angola is expected to struggle just to maintain output, with the International Energy Agency (IEA) warning that only Venezuela will see a bigger drop in production over the next five years.
Angola’s oil production peaked at 1.9 million bpd in 2008, the IEA said, warning in its five-year outlook that capacity will drop by some 370,000 bpd by 2023 even with the new projects.
“Angola is expected to post the biggest slide in capacity after Venezuela as aging oil fields lose steam and foreign investors, faced with relatively uncompetitive prospects, lose enthusiasm,” the IEA said.


Dubai’s Jumeirah eyes Saudi mega-projects

Updated 24 January 2020

Dubai’s Jumeirah eyes Saudi mega-projects

  • NEOM and Red Sea scheme high on group’s ‘address’ list, CEO tells Arab News

DAVOS: Jumeirah, the leading hotels and leisure group in the Middle East, is planning big developments in Saudi Arabia’s “mega-projects,” CEO Jose Silva told Arab News on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum annual meeting in Davos.

“We must be in those locations, but I want to make sure we get the right ‘address.’ Jumeiah always wants to be among the top three sites on any location. If someone convinces me this is the right address, I will jump into it,” he said.

Silva made clear he was thinking primarily about the two big development on the Kingdom’s west coast — the NEOM metropolis and the Red Sea project further south along the coast. He is believed to be in contact with Saudi Arabian tourism authorities and potential partners in the Kingdom.

Silva also said that Jumeirah was keen to open hotels in Makkah and Madinah, which he called “preferred entry” points in the Kingdom. Work has already begun on two sites.

“It is very important for us to acquire the right assets and the right designers. Unless we control the architect, we will not do it. We have to be involved in the design process,” he said.

A big presence in Saudi Arabia would be part of the strategy of “going global” that Silva has advanced in his first two years a head of the UAE-based hotels, leisure and restaurants business, which is owned by the government
of Dubai.

Last year, Jumeirah bought the Capri Palace on the eponymous Italian island, and is also involved in a major expansion plan in Asia, with six new projects underway in China, Indonesia and Malaysia.

Silva is also overseeing a $100 million renovation of the Carlton hotel in London’s Belgravia. Expansion via luxury hotel properties in other European capitals is also being considered.

In Dubai, he has brought in world-class managers to restaurants in the group’s flagship properties in Madinat and Burj Al Arab, with a clutch of “celebrity chefs” in place in restaurants there. 

“We want to be the best brand for ‘destination dining’,” he said.