New Louis Vuitton handbag seemingly a ‘copy’ of Egyptian company Okhtein's design

Louis Vuitton’s Fall-Winter 2018 collection seemingly has a handbag quite similar in its design to one designed by Egyptian brand Okhtein. (Photo: Scoop Empire)
Updated 11 March 2018

New Louis Vuitton handbag seemingly a ‘copy’ of Egyptian company Okhtein's design

CAIRO: Louis Vuitton’s Fall-Winter 2018 collection seemingly has a handbag quite similar in its design to one designed by Egyptian brand Okhtein.
The brand, which means “two sisters,” was launched in 2013 by Aya and Mounaz Abdelraouf and has since gone on to reach astronomical heights in its success around the Middle East.
Mounaz was quoted by Egyptian news website Scoop Empire as having thrown some major shade on Instagram, saying “When Louis Vuitton loves your design too much” with the hashtag “Anger Not Flattery!”
The Egyptian designer was comparing the LV bag to her own design.
When Beyoncé debuted a look on Instagram sporting a bag by Okhtein, the Egyptian luxury brand made waves and headlines all across the world.
The popular brand — which is sold in such high-end outlets as Bloomingdales in Dubai and Harvey Nichols in Saudi Arabia — is known for its quirky, cute and ultra-feminine bags and scarves.
Arab News tried to contact Okhtein for a comment, but could not be reached.

 


Local art scenes get more creative as pandemic keeps curtains closed

Updated 04 July 2020

Local art scenes get more creative as pandemic keeps curtains closed

DUBAI: All artists need to reinvent themselves to cope with changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, a veteran stand-up comedian said as he ventures on a four-country Zoom comedy tour that will kick off in the UAE.

Indian comedian Nitin Mirani said it was tough to adapt to how the entertainment industry is changing due to the pandemic, which forced a global shutdown of art and culture communities.

“Because of the pandemic, we have to now reincarnate. We have to be reborn. This is something we’ve never done before,” he told Arab News via Zoom, an increasingly popular platform not just for business meetings anymore, but also for the live-entertainment industry.

Although Mirani said he is enjoying the new experiences the pandemic has put him in as a comedian, he added that comedy is about “making moments with people,” which was been made difficult.

“Every art form comes with its own energy. I know that no matter how much you try, how hard you try, watching something online won’t give you goosebumps as much as watching Celine Dion hit one note live,” he said. “That’s the genesis of artform. It requires interaction. It’s an exchange of energies.”

Echoing Mirani’s sentiment was poet Dorian Paul Rogers, who founded Abu Dhabi-based culture and arts organization Rooftop Rhythms in 2012, and has been involved in virtual projects since the start of the pandemic.

“When you’re in person you get the spirit of the community — it’s palpable. You see people’s facial reactions. You see people snapping their fingers, laughing,” Rogers said.

“Our show is definitely a community-based show. That was my biggest fear — that the show may feel impersonal or may feel disconnected.”

But Rogers said there have been “many benefits to doing virtual events,” including being able to reach many people outside the region, both as audiences and performers.

Mirani and Rogers believe that the world needs art now more than ever as it struggles to overcome the impact of the pandemic.

“I feel like continuing these events at any capacity during the COVID-19 from a virtual standpoint is important because a lot of us need that connection,” said Rogers. “We lost that feeling of belonging. I believe that arts communities are critical for that reason.”