UAE’s ADNOC says awards Italy’s Eni stakes in new oil concessions

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Updated 12 March 2018

UAE’s ADNOC says awards Italy’s Eni stakes in new oil concessions

DUBAI: Abu Dhabi National Oil Company (ADNOC) said on Sunday it had signed 40-year agreements with Eni , awarding the Italian company a 10 percent stake in its Umm Shaif and Nasr offshore oil concession and a 5 percent stake in Lower Zakum.
Eni has contributed a participation fee of 2.1 billion dirhams ($575 million) for the Umm Shaif and Nasr offshore concession and a fee of 1.1 billion dirhams for the Lower Zakum oil concession, ADNOC said in a statement.
The signing ceremony in Abu Dhabi was attended by Abu Dhabi Crown Prince Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan and Italian premier Paolo Gentiloni.
“The awards mark the first time an Italian energy company has been given concession rights in Abu Dhabi’s oil and gas sector,” ADNOC said in the statement.
The agreements with Eni have a term of 40 years and are backdated to March 9, 2018, ADNOC said.
“Our partnership with Eni, and other concession partners, will enable us to accelerate our growth, increase revenue and improve integration across the upstream value chain,” ADNOC Chief Executive Sultan Al-Jaber said in the statement.
Last month, a consortium led by India’s Oil and Natural Gas Corp. (ONGC), Japan’s INPEX and Spain’s Cepsa were all awarded stakes in different areas of the offshore concession.
“This is the first award by ADNOC to a major (in the offshore renewal), and shows it is looking to find a balance in its strategic partners between companies from major buyers, such as Japan and India, and IOCs (international oil companies) with technology and project delivery expertise,” said Tom Quinn, senior research analyst, Middle East Upstream, Wood Mackenzie.
The ADNOC deal also provides low-risk, long-term supply to Eni, and lays the foundation for the Italian company’s Middle East portfolio, Quinn said.
ADNOC said on Sunday it was still finalizing opportunities with potential partners for the remaining 15 percent in the Lower Zakum concession and for the remaining 30 percent stake in the Umm Shaif and Nasr concession. ADNOC will keep a 60 percent share in both concessions.
In August, ADNOC said it would split its ADMA-OPCO offshore concession into three areas — Lower Zakum, Umm Shaif and Nasr, and Sateh Al Razboot and Umm Lulu — with new terms to unlock greater value and increase opportunities for partnerships.
The existing ADMA-OPCO concession, which expired on March 8 produces around 700,000 barrels per day (bpd) of oil and is projected to have a capacity of about 1.0 million bpd by 2021.
The original shareholders in the ADMA-OPCO included BP , and Total SA.


$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

Updated 53 min 55 sec ago

$8bn blow to Erdogan as investors flee Turkey

  • Overseas holdings in Istanbul stock exchange are at lowest in 16 years

ANKARA: Foreign capital is flooding out of Turkey in a massive vote of no confidence in President Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s economic competence.
Overseas investors have withdrawn nearly $8 billion from Turkish stocks since January, according to Central Bank statistics, reducing foreign investment in the Istanbul stock exchange from $32.3 billion to $24.4 billion.
As recently as 2013, the figure was $82 billion, and foreign investors now own less than 50 percent of stocks for the first time in 16 years.
“Foreign investment has left Turkey for several reasons, both internal and external,” Win Thin, global head of currency strategy at Brown Brothers Harriman, told Arab News.
“Externally, investors fled riskier assets like emerging markets during the height of the coronavirus pandemic. Some of those flows are returning, but investors are being much more discerning and Turkey does not seem so attractive.”
In terms of internal factors, Thin said that Turkish policymakers had made it hard for foreign investors to transact in Turkey. “This includes real money clients, not just speculative.
“By implementing ad hoc measures to try and limit speculative activity, Turkey has made it hard for real money as well. Besides these problems, Turkey’s fundamentals remain poor compared to much of the emerging markets.”
Erdogan allies claim international players are manipulating the Istanbul stock exchange through automated trading, and have demanded action to make it difficult for them to trade in Turkish assets.
Goldman Sachs, JPMorgan, Merrill Lynch, Barclays and Credit Suisse were banned this month from short-selling stocks for up to three months, and this year local lenders were briefly banned by the banking regulator from trading in Turkish lira with Citigroup, BNP Paribas and UBS
JPMorgan was investigated by Turkish authorities last year after the bank published a report that advised its clients to short sell the Turkish lira.
MSCI, the provider of research-based indexes and analytics, warned last month that it may relegate Turkey from emerging market status to frontier-market status because of bans on short selling and stock lending.
With the market becoming less transparent, overseas fund managers, especially with short-term portfolios, are unenthusiastic about the Turkish market and are becoming more concerned about any forthcoming introduction of other liquidity restrictions.
The exodus of foreign capital is likely to undermine Turkey’s drive for economic growth, especially during the coronavirus pandemic when employment and investment levels have gone down, with the Turkish lira facing serious volatility.