Picasso painting the main draw at Rockefeller art ‘sale of the century’

Christie's employees stand next to 'Fillette a la corbeille fleurie' by Pablo Picasso from the collection of Peggy and David Rockefeller during a sale preview at Christie's auction house in Paris, France March 13, 2018. Picture taken March 13, 2018. REUTERS/Gonzalo Fuentes NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVES
Updated 14 March 2018

Picasso painting the main draw at Rockefeller art ‘sale of the century’

PARIS: One of Picasso’s most unsettling paintings returns to Paris on Friday more than a century after he painted it in that city, as a taster for what is being billed the art “sale of the century.”
One of the rarest Picasso paintings, once owned by Gertrude Stein, is part of an art trove belonging to the Rockefeller dynasty that could raise half a billion dollars this year, in what auctioneer Christie’s says could be the most valuable sale ever of a private collection.
With the art market surging, the nude “Young Girl With a Flower Basket” is expected to make at least $100 million (81 million euros) when it goes under the hammer in New York in May along with works by Monet, Renoir and Gauguin from the private collection of US billionaires Peggy and David Rockefeller.
Auction house Christie’s expects the sale of the 1,600 works of art amassed by the couple to top $600 million — easily beating the world record set in Paris in 2009 when the collection put together by the fashion designer Yves Saint Laurent and his partner Pierre Berge made $484 million.
They include one of Monet’s waterlily paintings as a well as one of his famously smoky views of St. Lazare station in Paris and three Miro murals which are expected to fetch $25 million.
“It’s a really historic moment, the biggest private collection ever put up for auction,” Christie’s French head Francois de Ricqles told AFP.
It not only represents the works collected by “a couple of great taste,” he said, “but with the addition of the items they inherited reflects the passion of generations of the Rockefeller family for art.”
David Rockefeller, the former head of Chase Manhattan Bank, died last year aged 101, two decades after his wife.
The entire proceeds of the sale will go to charitable causes including Harvard University and conservation groups in the state of Maine, where the Rockefeller family had summer homes.
The Picasso, a masterpiece from his pink period in 1905, is one of 10 works being shown by Sotheby’s in the French capital in the run-up to the sale.
Once owned by Picasso’s friend, the American poet and novelist Gertrude Stein, it has not been shown in Paris in more than 50 years.
Stein initially was troubled by the side-on view and the girl’s “repulsive” feet, but her husband Leo loved it. When they split up, however, she kept the painting for herself, leaving him their Cezannes.
The Rockefellers were equally attached to it, not allowing it to leave their home on 65th Street in New York after they bought it in 1968.
Selected works from the collection are being displayed around the world leading up to the sale.
The Paris show also includes Georges Seurat’s picture of sailing boats, “La Rade de Grandcamp,” which is expected to make up to $30 million and Eugene Delacroix’s “Tiger Playing with a Tortoise” (1862), which has an estimate of $7 million.


Lolo Zouai reconnects with Algerian roots in new music video

Lolo Zouai unveiled her newest music video this week. (Instagram)
Updated 25 January 2020

Lolo Zouai reconnects with Algerian roots in new music video

  • The new video for singer Lolo Zouai’s “Desert Rose” is here
  • Filmed in Morocco, the clip is a celebration of Zouai’s North African roots

DUBAI: The new video for singer Lolo Zouai’s “Desert Rose” is here and it’s a beautiful celebration of her North African roots.

The Franco-Algerian singer, who was born Laureen Zouai in France to a French mother and an Algerian father and relocated to San Francisco with her family when she was three-months-old, wrote the song as a love letter to her Algerian family.

Zouai (pronounced “zoo-eye”) has been vocal about her period of internal struggle during which she felt she wasn’t as in touch with her Algerian heritage as she would have liked. These feelings informed her fourth single, whose title alludes to the rose-like crystal formations that occur in the desert of Algeria, and further plays on her existing feelings of not belonging.

Filmed in an unnamed village situated in Morocco’s Essaouira, the Emilie Badenhorst-directed clip further captures the 24-year-old’s feelings of displacement and desperate longing to reconnect with her father’s side of the family’s culture and traditions.

In the video, the singer croons “‘Inshallah,’ that’s what you say/ You think I lost my faith,” as she fraternizes with local children, watches a group of elders make couscous and traverses the sea in a boat all while wearing a mix of Western clothing and traditional Berber accessories.  

“I’m so grateful I was able to travel to North Africa to tell my story. To be honest, I was really scared to share this part of my life, but hopefully you guys understand me a little better now,” she shared with her 223,000 Instagram followers, alongside a wilted rose emoji.

“Desert Rose” is from her debut studio album entitled “High Highs to Low Lows” that dropped in 2019. Since its release, the project has amassed more than 50 million streams worldwide. In addition to the success of her own LP, the singer was also recognized for her song-writing skills in 2019 when she took home her first Grammy award for co-writing “Still Down” from H.E.R.’s self-titled album, which took home the R&B Album of the Year award at the Grammys that same year.

As of now, the Brooklyn-based singer is set to open up for British crooner Dua Lipa’s “Future Nostalgia” European tour in 2020.

The new music video will be screened all week at Time’s Square and Madison Square Garden in New York as well as The Staples Center in Los Angeles.