Careem insists business as usual in Egypt despite legal row

Careem said it had full confidence in Egypt’s judicial system following a legal move to halt the operations of the company alongside rival Uber. (Reuters)
Updated 21 March 2018

Careem insists business as usual in Egypt despite legal row

LONDON: Careem said it had full confidence in Egypt’s judicial system following a legal move to halt the operations of the company alongside rival Uber.
The pair are the focus of protests by Egyptian taxi drivers who say that their drivers are not required to pay fees to operate transportation services.
An Egyptian court this week accepted a petition that demanded the government stop licensing Uber and Careem activities in Egypt, including their online applications, state-owned newspaper Al-Ahram reported.
The lawyer representing taxi drivers, Khaled Al-Gamal, told AFP that the ruling would have to be implemented by the government even if Uber and UAE-based Careem appeal.
“They have to stop operations and block their mobile applications on the Internet,” he told AFP.
But both companies said their operations have not been officially suspended.
“We have full confidence in the Egyptian judicial system and should any verdict be reached against the ride-hailing industry, we will follow the requisite judicial procedures available under Egyptian Law,” said Careem in a statement to Arab News. “For now, we will continue as business as usual.”


Turkish Airlines may delay delivery of Airbus, Boeing planes

Updated 27 May 2020

Turkish Airlines may delay delivery of Airbus, Boeing planes

  • The carrier plans to begin some domestic flights on June 4 and international on June 10
  • Airlines chairman said the impact of the coronavirus on market could last up to five years

ISTANBUL: Turkish Airlines, which halted nearly all of its passenger flights as a result of the coronavirus crisis, may delay the delivery of some Boeing and Airbus planes, its chairman was quoted as saying on Wednesday.
The carrier plans to begin some domestic flights on June 4 and some international flights on June 10 as airlines worldwide try to get planes flying again after a global travel slump.
But Turkish Airlines chairman Ilker Ayci said in an interview with Turkey’s Hurriyet newspaper that the impact of the coronavirus could last up to five years and that it would take a while to reach 2019 load factor levels.
Turkish Airlines had received half of its order for 25 Boeing 787-9 planes, he said, adding that the delivery of the rest could be delayed.
The airline is in talks to take delivery of Airbus 350-900s that are ready from an order of 25, and that it was working to delay the delivery of the rest, he said.
“We are trying to lighten the serious loads that could arise. We are getting our narrow-body planes.”
Ayci said Turkish Airlines would no longer offer free in-flight food and drinks on domestic flights and other flights shorter than two hours.
He also repeated that the company would try to maintain employment, but that salaries would have to be adjusted, with the aim of supporting those paid the least.