Huffington Post shuts down its Arabic news website

The Huffington Post have decided to shut down its Arabic edition. (Screenshot)
Updated 01 April 2018

Huffington Post shuts down its Arabic news website

CAIRO: The Huffington Post have decided to shut down its Arabic edition, HuffPost Arabi, after three years of operation.
The Huffington Post Media Group said the step came in line with a mutual decision with its partner Integral Media Strategies.
A message on the website’s main page said: “HuffPost Arabi will no longer be publishing content as of March 30.” Instead, it directed readers to the mother website Huffpost.com or asked them to check out a new online portal named “Arabi Post.”
Huffington Post partnered with Wadah Khanfar, the former CEO of Al Jazeera Media Network, to launch its Arabic edition in 2015.
The platform was dedicated for covering news across the Arab World, but was often criticized for its controversial content deemed inconsistent with the liberal American news brand.
The website was already inaccessible in some Arab countries over alleged affiliations with the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood group.


Amazon under fire in Holocaust row over ‘Hunters’ series

Updated 24 February 2020

Amazon under fire in Holocaust row over ‘Hunters’ series

  • “Hunters,” released on Friday and starring Al Pacino, features a team of Nazi hunters in 1970s New York who discover that hundreds of escaped Nazis are living in the US

WARSAW: The Auschwitz Memorial criticized Amazon on Sunday for fictitious depictions of the Holocaust in its Prime series “Hunters” and for selling books of Nazi propaganda.

Seventy-five years after the liberation of the Nazi German Auschwitz death camp by Soviet troops, world leaders and activists have called for action against rising anti-Semitism.

“Hunters,” released on Friday and starring Al Pacino, features a team of Nazi hunters in 1970s New York who discover that hundreds of escaped Nazis are living in the US.

However, the series has faced accusations of bad taste, particularly for depicting fictional atrocities in Nazi death camps, such as a game of human chess in which people are killed when a piece is taken.

“Inventing a fake game of human chess for @huntersonprime is not only dangerous foolishness & caricature. It also welcomes future deniers,” the Auschwitz Memorial tweeted.

“We honor the victims by preserving factual accuracy.”

The Auschwitz Memorial is responsible for preserving the Nazi German death camp in southern Poland, where more than 1.1 million people, most of them Jews, perished in gas chambers or from starvation, cold and disease.

“While ‘Hunters’ is a dramatic narrative series, with largely fictional characters, it is inspired by true events. But it is not documentary. And it was never purported to be,” David Weil, creator and executive producer of “Hunters” said.

“In speaking to the ‘chess match’ scene specifically… this is a fictionalized event. Why did I feel this scene was important to script and place in series? To most powerfully counteract the revisionist narrative that whitewashes Nazi perpetration, by showcasing the most extreme — and representationally truthful — sadism and violence that the Nazis perpetrated against the Jews and other victims,” Weil added.

Amazon has also faced criticism for selling anti-Semitic books.

On Friday, the memorial retweeted a letter from the Holocaust Educational Trust to Amazon asking that anti-Semitic children’s books by Nazi Julius Streicher, who was executed for crimes against humanity, be removed from sale.

“When you decide to make a profit on selling vicious antisemitic Nazi propaganda published without any critical comment or context, you need to remember that those words led not only to the #Holocaust but also many other hate crimes,” the Auschwitz Memorial tweeted on Sunday.

“As a bookseller, we are mindful of book censorship throughout history, and we do not take this lightly. We believe that providing access to written speech is important, including books that some may find objectionable,” an Amazon spokesman said in a comment emailed to Reuters.

In December, Amazon withdrew from sale products decorated with images of Auschwitz, including Christmas decorations, after the memorial complained.

Separately, prosecutors launched an investigation into a primary school in the Polish town of Labunie, which staged a
reenactment of Auschwitz with children dressed as prisoners being gassed, local media reported.