Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah

Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah
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The race was held in afully equipped sportsenvironment and ladieswere free to wear normalsports suits, as it wasan all-female event. Themarathon fence wascovered with black satin tomaintain the participants’privacy.(AN photos)
Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah
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Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah
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Winners of the race in two different categories. (AN photo)
Updated 02 April 2018

Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah

Big cheers for participants in women’s races in Jeddah

JEDDAH: King Abdullah Sports City (KASC) witnessed a rare event on Saturday: The biggest women’s running event in the city.
A public women’s running event is an unusual sight in the Kingdom. Many women’s races have been held in the past few years but privately, and they have been limited to certain universities and schools unlike this one, which was done on a city level.
The race was held in a fully equipped sports environment and ladies were free to wear normal sports suits, as it was an all-female event.
The marathon fence was covered with black satin to maintain the participants’ privacy.
The event, organized by Activity Team and Petromin Corp. and supported by the Saudi Mass Participation Federation, aimed to introduce the Saudi community to sports and encourage more people to participate in the forthcoming events.
There was a male running event in the morning at the same place, which was attended by males of all ages, and a chance for people with special needs (in wheelchairs) to participate from 7 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. Access to the race was free for all the audience.
More than 350 female participants gathered in the KASC around 5 p.m. They were divided into three groups, as follows:
1. 4km group, children from 8 to 13
2. 8km group, teenagers from 14 to 17
3. 20km group, women between 18 and 60

Winner of the children’s group race, Lara Al-Saggaf, 12, who was awarded a PlayStation3, told Arab News: “I’m so happy. I challenged myself to reach the endpoint.”
Winner of the second race, Nadimah Abu Alaineen, 17, who won SR2,000 ($533), said: “It’s more than great to feel the spirit of the audience who were cheering for me.”
Arwaa Al-Amoodi, who won the third and longest race, told Arab News: “I am glad to win this race. I am actually a fitness coach.”
King Abdul Aziz Stadium and Al Wehda Club (a multi-sports club team from Makkah) will host the first women’s marathon in Makkah on April 6 under the patronage of the General Authority for Sport and the president of the Saudi Federation of Community Sports, Princess Reema bint Bandar.


Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities
Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program. (SPA)
Updated 24 January 2021

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities

Madinah joins world’s healthiest cities
  • The holy city gained World Health Organization accreditation after meeting all global standards

JEDDAH: The Saudi city of Madinah has been acknowledged by the World Health Organization (WHO) as among the world’s healthiest cities.
The holy city gained the accreditation after a visiting WHO team said that it met all the global standards required to be a healthy city.
Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program.
A total of 22 government, community, charity and volunteer agencies helped prepare for the WHO accreditation.
The city’s integrated program included a strategic partnership with Taibah University to record government requirements on an electronic platform for the organization’s review.
The WHO also recommended that the university provide training to other national city agencies interested in taking part in the healthy cities program.

FASTFACTS

• Madinah is believed to be the first city with a population of more than 2 million to be recognized under the organization’s healthy cities program.

• A total of 22 government, community, charity and volunteer agencies helped prepare for the WHO accreditation.

A committee chaired by the university’s president, Dr. Abdul Aziz Assarani, supervised 100 members representing the 22 government, civil, charity and volunteer agencies.
Criteria included meeting goals set by the Madinah Region Strategy Project and the launch of a “Humanizing Cities” program.
According to WHO, “a healthy city is one that is continually creating and improving those physical and social environments and expanding those community resources which enable people to mutually support each other in performing all the functions of life and developing to their maximum potential.”