Hamas offers $3,000 for families of those killed by Israel

Palestinian medics treat a wounded protester during a protest next to Gaza's border with Israel, east of Khan Younis, Gaza Strip. (AP)
Updated 06 April 2018

Hamas offers $3,000 for families of those killed by Israel

  • $3,000 will go to families of the deceased and those seriously wounded will get $500
  • 18 Palestinians were killed last week when protesters clashed with Israeli forces

Gaza City: Gaza’s Islamist rulers Hamas have offered to pay $3,000 to the family of any Palestinian killed by Israeli troops along the border, ahead of new expected protests.
In a statement, the group said it would support the “family of each martyr” with $3,000, while those seriously wounded would receive $500.
The payments were being provided “in light of the difficult economic conditions experienced by our people in the Gaza Strip as a result of the continued Israeli siege.”
A protest by tens of thousands near the Gaza border last Friday led to clashes in which Israeli forces killed 18 Palestinians.
Another mass protest is expected on Friday.
Israel has faced calls for an independent investigation from the European Union and United Nations chief Antonio Guterres over last week’s violence.
It has rejected the calls, saying Israeli soldiers opened fire when necessary to prevent attacks, attempts to damage the fence and infiltrations.
Palestinians say protesters were fired on while posing no threat to soldiers.
Hamas is considered a terrorist organization by Israel, the United States and the European Union.
UN officials and rights groups say the blockade amounts to collective punishment of the two million residents.

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Gaza blockade

Israel has maintained a blockade on Gaza for more than a decade that it argues is necessary to isolate Hamas, with whom it has fought three wars since 2008.


Sudan’s deposed Bashir questioned over 1989 coup: lawyer

Updated 10 December 2019

Sudan’s deposed Bashir questioned over 1989 coup: lawyer

KHARTOUM: Sudan’s former president Omar Al-Bashir appeared on Tuesday before a prosecutors’ committee over the 1989 coup that brought him to power, his lawyer said.
Bashir was “brought to be investigated in the case of the alleged 1989 coup,” said his lawyer, Mohamed Al-Hassan, who did not attend the hearing.
The lawyer also told reporters that in his view the hearing was “not a judicial matter, it’s a political matter.”
In 1989, Bashir, a brigadier at the time, seized power in an Islamist-backed coup that toppled the elected government of prime minister Sadiq Al-Mahdi.
The former president was himself ousted by the army in April of this year after months of nationwide protests against his iron-fisted rule of three decades.
On November 12, Sudanese authorities filed charges against Bashir and some of his aides for “plotting” the 1989 coup. The prosecution established a special committee for the case.
If found guilty, he could face the death penalty or life imprisonment under Sudanese law.
Sudan is now ruled by a joint civilian and military sovereign council, which is tasked with overseeing a transition to civilian rule as demanded by the protest movement.
Bashir is being held in Kober prison in a separate case, for which he has been on trial since August, on charges of illegally acquiring and using foreign funds.
A verdict is due in that case on Saturday.
On Tuesday, Bashir was taken from Kober prison to the prosecutor’s office in a convoy under strong armed protection.
After the hearing, which lasted about an hour, a crowd gathered in front of the prosecutor’s office, chanting “Kober prison — the best place for you!” and “you killed people!“
Wearing the traditional white Sudanese jalabiya and turban, Bashir raised his hands to the crowd, before he set off back toward Kober in the convoy.
The veteran leader is also wanted by The Hague-based International Criminal Court on charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity over his role in the war in Sudan’s western Darfur region.
To date, Sudanese transitional authorities do not want to extradite the former leader to The Hague.