Rolls-Royce sells German unit L’Orange

Rolls-Royce is looking to simplify its operations by off-loading German division L’Orange for €700 million. (Getty Images)
Updated 09 April 2018

Rolls-Royce sells German unit L’Orange

  • Stuttgart-based L’Orange, which supplies fuel injection technology for engines, employs 1,000 people.
  • L’Orange will be renamed Woodward L’Orange and will continue to supply Rolls-Royce Power Systems.

London: British engine maker Rolls-Royce said Monday it has sold German division L’Orange for €700 million ($860 million) to US group Woodward.
Stuttgart-based L’Orange, which supplies fuel injection technology for engines, employs 1,000 people mostly in Germany.
The announcement marks the biggest disposal under the tenure of Warren East, who has been Rolls-Royce chief executive since July 2015.
“This transaction builds on the actions we have taken over the last two years to simplify our business,” East said in a statement unveiling the news.
“The divestiture of L’Orange enables Rolls-Royce Power Systems to focus on other long-term, high growth opportunities and our company to allocate our capital to core technologies and businesses that drive greater returns for the group.”
Woodward, based in Fort Collins, Colorado, designs and manufactures control system solutions and components for the aerospace and industrial markets.
L’Orange will be renamed Woodward L’Orange and will continue to supply Rolls-Royce Power Systems under a long-term supply deal with an initial term of 15 years.
The deal is expected to complete in the second quarter of 2018, subject to German regulatory approval.
London-listed Rolls-Royce, whose engines are used in Airbus and Boeing aircraft, also makes power systems for use on land and at sea.


S&P downgrades trio of Dubai developers as pandemic hits property and retail

Updated 24 min 46 sec ago

S&P downgrades trio of Dubai developers as pandemic hits property and retail

  • Gulf states are being hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic that has come at a time of weak oil prices

RIYADH: The credit ratings of three Dubai property companies were downgraded by S&P as the coronavirus pandemic hits confidence in the retail and real estate sectors.
S&P Global Ratings reduced the credit ratings for the real estate developer Emaar Properties as well as Emaar Malls to +BB from -BBB with a negative forward outlook, adding that it sees a “weakening across all its business segments” in 2020. S&P also cut its rating for DIFC Investments to +BB from -BBB, while keeping a stable outlook.
Gulf states are being hit hard by the coronavirus pandemic that has come at a time of weak oil prices, heaping pressure on governments, companies and employees.
The ratings agency expects the emirate’s economy to shrink by 11 percent this year
“The supply-demand imbalance in the realty sector appears to have been exacerbated by the pandemic. We now expect to see international demand for Dubai’s property to be subdued, and the fall in residential prices to be steeper than we had expected, lingering well into 2021” S&P reported.
Despite easing restrictions and the opening of the economy, S&P said that overall macroeconomic conditions remained challenging.
Global travel restrictions and social distancing constraints “significantly weigh on Dubai’s tourism and hospitality sectors” the rating agency reported.
Still, Dubai’s tourism chief was upbeat on the emirate’s prospects when international tourism resumes.
“Once we do get to the other side, as we start to talk about next year and later on, we see very much a quick uptick. Because once things normalize, people will go back to travel again,” Helal Al-Marri, director general of Dubai’s Department of Tourism and Commerce Marketing told AFP in an interview.