Oil theft ‘costing Libya over $750m annually’

A general view of the industrial zone at the oil port of Ras Lanuf can be seen in this file photo. (Reuters)
Updated 19 April 2018

Oil theft ‘costing Libya over $750m annually’

  • Libya’s oil sector collapsed in the wake of the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi.
  • The recovery of oil production and exports is key to restoring Libya’s economy.

Tripoli: Fuel smuggling is costing Libya more than $750 million each year and harming its economy and society, the head of the National Oil Company in the conflict-riddled country said.
“The impact of fuel smuggling is destroying the fabric of the country,” NOC president Mustafa Sanalla said according to the text of a speech delivered on Wednesday at a conference on oil and fuel theft in Geneva.
“The fuel smugglers and thieves have permeated not only the militias which control much of Libya, but also the fuel distribution companies which are supposed to bring cheap fuel to Libyan citizens,” he said.
“The huge sums of money available from smuggling have corrupted large parts of Libyan society,” he added.
The backbone of the North African country’s economy, Libya’s oil sector collapsed in the wake of the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi.
Before the revolt Libya, with estimated oil reserves of 48 billion barrels, used to produce 1.6 million barrels per day (bpd).
But output fell to less than 500,000 bpd between 2014 and 2016 due to violence around production facilities and export terminals as rival militias fought for control of Africa’s largest crude reserves.
No oil was exported from Libya’s main ports until September 2016 with the reopening of the Ras Lanuf terminal in the country’s so-called oil crescent.
The recovery of oil production and exports is key to restoring Libya’s moribund economy.
Sanalla urged Libya’s “friends, neighbors but above all the Libyan people themselves... to do everything they can... to eradicate the scourge of fuel theft and fuel smuggling.”


Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

“I always think success is married with passion,” Simon Lowden said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him
Updated 14 November 2019

Key to success is passion: PepsiCo official

  • Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

RIYADH: The key to success is being passionate about what you do, Simon Lowden, chief sustainability officer at PepsiCo, told a brainstorming session at the Misk Global Forum in Riyadh on Wednesday.

“I always think success is married with passion,” he said, adding that he likes to get involved with ideas that excite him.

“I started my life in a small farming village, went to London to attend university, joined PepsiCo … and now I run our sustainability agenda,” he said. “This made me rich as a person, and I did things I really enjoyed.”

Lowden was speaking at a session titled “100 years is a long time: Preparing for multiple shifts.”

Other panelists included Dave Brooke, vice president of client solutions at Dell Technologies; Kevin Gaskell, an international speaker on leadership and business performance; Deloitte CEO David Sproul; and Nancy Yammout, general director of the NGO Rescue Me. The session was moderated by Lebanese journalist and politician Naufal Daou.