Islam forbids incitement: Makkah Grand Mosque imam

Updated 21 April 2018

Islam forbids incitement: Makkah Grand Mosque imam

  • He said that incitement was a satanic feature which led to corruption
  • He said that Islam forbids incitement and makes it equal to treason

MAKKAH: The imam of the Grand Mosque in Makkah, Sheikh Saud bin Ibrahim Al-Shouraim, has asked Muslims to cooperate because Allah encourages and blesses unity, stressing the importance of working together to develop human societies.

Al-Shouraim said in a Friday sermon that no matter how much people and societies developed scientifically and materially, they would not achieve any goals without ethics. “When incitement afflicts any society, it will certainly divide its people, and when it enters any family, it will destroy it and turn friendship into hostility.”

He said that incitement was a satanic feature which led to corruption, and that an agitator is an evil person who envies others and seeks to corrupt good values.

He also said that Islam forbids incitement and makes it equal to treason, adding that Islam encourages collaboration and cooperation and forbids all types of incitement, including the incitement between husband and wife, different individuals and different groups in society. 

He said that listeners should not trust everything they hear before they corroborate its validity, stressing that there is no safety for the individual and the group unless they stay away from incitement and prevent it before it causes real damage.

In Madinah, the imam of the Prophet’s Mosque, Sheikh Abdullah Al-Buaijan, said the virtues of fasting some days of the month of Shaban, which is considered a good season for worship. He also noted that the month of Shaban helped Muslims to prepare for the month of Ramadan, adding that fasting is one of the best kinds of worship.


Hana Abdullah Alomair, Saudi film director

Updated 30 May 2020

Hana Abdullah Alomair, Saudi film director

Hana Abdullah Alomair is the director of Netflix’s first Saudi thriller original series, titled “Whispers,” which is due to begin streaming in 190 countries on June 11. 

A Saudi writer, filmmaker, and movie critic, Alomair won the Silver Palm Tree Award for best script at the Saudi Film Competition in 2008.

She gained a bachelor’s degree in Arabic-English translation from King Saud University in 1992 and four years later a master’s degree in the same field of study from Heriot-Watt University, in Scotland.

Her documentary “Beyond Words” was screened during the Gulf Film Festival in 2019 and was selected for the main competition in this year’s Muscat International Film Festival.

A member of the Saudi Arabian Society for Culture and Arts, she has worked as a head writer in writing workshops for several TV series. She was a jury member at the Saudi Film Festival held by Rotana in 2013. Her second
flick, “The Complaint,” was selected in the main competition of Tessa’s Festival for Asian and African Films in Morocco in 2014 and it won the Golden Palm
Tree Award for best short fiction film in the Saudi Film Competition in 2015.

In 2016, Alomair, together with Hind Al-Fahhad, scooped the prize for best script for the short film “Peddlers” at the King Fahd Center Short Film Competition.

She recently published a book about the Japanese film director Akira Kurosawa, and in 2017 wrote a play called “Qat Oqat.”

Last year, she wrote and directed her latest short film “Swan Song,” which won the Golden Palm Tree Award for best actor in the Saudi Film Festival.