FaceOf: KSA’s new envoy to Egypt and the Arab League Osama Nugali

Ambassador Osama Nugali
Updated 22 April 2018

FaceOf: KSA’s new envoy to Egypt and the Arab League Osama Nugali

  • Nugali replaced Ahmed bin Abdul Aziz Kattan, who had served as the Kingdom’s envoy to Egypt for the last 14 year
  • He had served at the Saudi Embassy in the US for nine years and in various capacities in Saudi Foreign Ministry delegations

Osama Nugali was appointed as Saudi Arabia’s ambassador to Egypt and permanent representative to the Arab League on April 4, replacing Ahmed bin Abdul Aziz Kattan, who had served as the Kingdom’s envoy to Egypt for the last 14 years before his recent appointment as the Saudi Minister of State for African Affairs.

Nugali was sworn in on Tuesday as the new envoy to Egypt during a ceremony attended by King Salman.

“I pray that I will always live up to the expectations of our sage leaders and continue to be enlightened by their wisdom and guidance,” the newly appointed ambassador tweeted.

Earlier, Nugali was the Saudi deputy minister of foreign affairs for public diplomacy, and the director of media department at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Nugali earned a bachelor’s degree in business administration from King Abdul Aziz University in Jeddah in 1980, and a diploma from the Institute of Diplomatic Studies in 1983. 

He has worked at the Saudi Embassy in Washington, DC, for nine years since 1988. 

Nugali also served as a member of the Board of Radio and Television, a member of the presidency of the Saudi Press Agency, and a member of the scientific advisory board of the UNESCO chair for interreligious dialogue.

He also served in various capacities in Saudi Foreign Ministry delegations since 2000. 

Nugali is known for his active interaction on social media, mainly Twitter, as he represents the Kingdom’s voice that defends its positions and interests in local and international media. 

 


E-visa service makes it easier than ever for Saudis to visit India

A plane is seen at the taxiway after landing at Kochi's International airport in the Indian state of Kerala on August 29, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 26 January 2020

E-visa service makes it easier than ever for Saudis to visit India

  • The cost of a one-year, multiple-entry tourist visa was reduced from $80 to $40, while a five year, multiple entry tourist visa costs $80

RIYADH: The introduction last year of an online “e-visa” service for Saudi nationals who want to visit India was an important development in the growing relationship between the nations.
The system, announced during a state visit by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman to India in February last year, was launched on June 17.
It allows Saudi citizens to apply online for tourist, business, medical and conference visas. In addition, fees were reduced and longer-term visas were introduced.
A short duration, one-month visa for tourists, with double entry, costs $10 between April and June and $25 the rest of the year. The cost of a one-year, multiple-entry tourist visa was reduced from $80 to $40, while a five year, multiple entry tourist visa costs $80.
The other types of e-visa available to Saudi nationals, all of which cost $80, are: Business visa (valid for a year, multiple entry), conference visa (valid for 30 days, single entry), and medical visa and medical attendant visa (both of which are valid for 60 days, triple entry).

BACKGROUND

In addition to the e-visa system, traditional paper visas are still available from the Indian Embassy, and the time taken to process them for Saudi nationals has been reduced to two working days.

For more information about e-visas for Saudi citizens, and to apply for one, visit https://indianvisaonline.gov.in/evisa/tvoa.html. Applications must be made at least four days before the planned date of travel.
In addition to the e-visa system, traditional paper visas are still available from the Indian Embassy, and the time taken to process them for Saudi nationals has been reduced to two working days. Last year, 19,116 e-visas and 18,598 paper visas were issued to Saudis.