Syrian ‘Big Brother’ finalist Kaysar Dadour becomes unlikely hero in Brazil

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Aleppo-born Kaysar Dadour sought refuge in Brazil in June 2014. (Supplied)
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The city of Belo Horizonte was hosting its first Festival of Syrian and Lebanese Food and Culture and the Brazilians were embracing it wholeheartedly. (Supplied)
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The city of Belo Horizonte was hosting its first Festival of Syrian and Lebanese Food and Culture and the Brazilians were embracing it wholeheartedly. (Supplied)
Updated 26 April 2018

Syrian ‘Big Brother’ finalist Kaysar Dadour becomes unlikely hero in Brazil

  • Aleppo-born Kaysar Dadour sought refuge in Brazil in June 2014
  • In early April, he became the first foreigner to reach the final of the country’s hit reality TV show “Big Brother Brasil”

BELO HORIZONTE: On an otherwise quiet Saturday morning in April, a shaded street in southeastern Brazil hummed to the sound of Middle Eastern music. The city of Belo Horizonte was hosting its first Festival of Syrian and Lebanese Food and Culture and the Brazilians were embracing it wholeheartedly — much like they have embraced a 28 year-old Syrian refugee for the past three months.

Aleppo-born Kaysar Dadour sought refuge in Brazil in June 2014. In early April, he became the first foreigner to reach the final of the country’s hit reality TV show “Big Brother Brasil.” He eventually finished in second place, racked up more than 2.5 million followers on Instagram, and walked away with US$44,000. He said he plans to use the prize money to extract his parents from the ongoing war in his native country.

A loud, smiley extrovert who changed his hairstyle on a near-weekly basis and charmed viewers with his occasional mispronunciation of Portuguese words, Kaysar worked as a waiter before entering the Big Brother house. He was accused of being disingenuous by some of the other 19 housemates, who insisted nobody could be so happy and energetic all of the time — especially someone who claimed he had lost a girlfriend and an uncle to war and was forced to sleep on the streets in Ukraine after fleeing Aleppo in 2011.

Yet to those fans enjoying shwarmaskibe and esfihas at the food festival, Kaysar proved a positive force, providing a different perspective of a situation they knew only from watching and reading the news.

“I voted for him to win,” said Brigitte Bacha, a dance instructor wearing a white t-shirt with “Peace in Syria” emblazoned across the front. “It is so important that he was on the show, because he showed the reality of the situation there. It was obvious he has a good character. He works hard and has integrated himself into our country. He showed that refugees are just like you and me, but they find themselves in a bad place just now.”

Lili Resende, a Brazilian attending with a Romanian friend, said she had not watched much of the show, but had been supporting Kaysar so that he could afford to save his family from war. “The perception of refugees here is already very good, but I was supporting him and wanting him to win because he and his family have suffered a lot,” said Resende, who shares an apartment building with various Syrians and helps them sell native food products at the local market. 

Brazil has long welcomed refugees from the Middle East. An influx of Lebanese in the late 19th Century resulted in Brazil being home to more Lebanese than any country outside Lebanon. More than 3,000 Syrians have reportedly arrived in recent years. Organizers of Saturday’s festival said they had expected around 3,000 visitors throughout the day, but the final headcount came in at 7,040. Entry was free, but each guest had to donate one kilogram of non-perishable food to a local charity. 

“Arab families gather together to eat, so we thought why not bring together the Brazilian people to eat Arab food together,” said the Consul of Syria for Minas Gerais state, Emir Cadar. As the smell of koftas and shish barak wafted through the air, flyers for Arabic lessons were distributed, vendors sold handmade chessboards, dresses and shisha pipes, and belly dancers swayed and jolted to live Middle Eastern music. 

“We dream of an end to war,” said Cadar — a statement in contrast to the official line that his government broadcast earlier in the day in which it was claimed “the Syrian people are happy” and that the country “is a victim of lies and fake news.”


Numbers prove Bella Hadid is world’s most beautiful

Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty. (AFP)
Updated 18 October 2019

Numbers prove Bella Hadid is world’s most beautiful

DUBAI: US-Palestinian model Bella Hadid has been declared the most beautiful woman in the world on the basis of an ancient Greek equation that measures beauty.

London-based cosmetic surgeon Julian De Silva made the claim using the so-called “golden ratio of beauty,” which found Hadid’s facial features to be 94.35 percent symmetric.

“Her eyes, eyebrows, nose, lips, chin, jaw and facial shape were measured and came closest to the ancient Greeks’ idea of perfection,” the surgeon wrote on his Instagram account.

“The golden ratio was a mathematical equation devised by the Greeks in an attempt to measure beauty,” he explained.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi 2/10 #jdsgoldenratio @beyonce - 92.44% Beyoncé came in second place as she scored highly on her forehead and brow area. She looks incredible as she approaches her 40s. She had a near perfect score for her face shape. How is the Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi measured? The Golden Ratio of Beauty Phi originates from the European Renaissance. Artists and Architects used an equation - known as the Golden Ratio - as an aid during the creation of their masterpieces. Scientists have since adapted the mathematical formula to explain what makes a person beautiful. The length and the width of someone's face is measured and then the results are divided. According to the Golden Ratio, the ideal result is roughly 1.6. Measurements are then taken from the forehead hairline to the spot between the eyes, from the spot between the eyes and the bottom of the nose and from the bottom of the nose to the bottom of the chin. A person is considered to be more beautiful if the numbers are equal. Attention is then given to the symmetry and proportion of the face. To be deemed 'beautiful' according to the Golden Ratio, the length of the ear must be equal to the length of the nose and the width of an eye should be equal to the distance between the eyes. #news#beauty#plasticsurgery#harleystreet#beautifacation#beautifulfaces#jdsgoldenratio

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The US singer Beyonce was ranked second with a 92.44 percent symmetry reading.