History goes under the hammer as London celebrates Islamic art

History goes under the hammer as London celebrates Islamic art
Updated 27 April 2018

History goes under the hammer as London celebrates Islamic art

History goes under the hammer as London celebrates Islamic art
  • Leading auction houses this week embarked on an 1,800-year artistic odyssey with treasures from across the region
  • A painting by the late Egyptian painter Mahmoud Said fetched the highest bid £633,000

LONDON: For aficionados of Middle Eastern art, London was the place to be this week. During the biannual Islamic Art Week, the big auction houses held sales of everything from antiquities to modern-art installations, with many works receiving well above their estimates.

Sotheby’s 20th Century Art/Middle East on Tuesday featured two Saudi artists, Ahmed Mater and Maha Malluh, alongside works by  Morocco’s Farid Belkahia, Lebanon’s Paul Guiragossian, Iraq’s Shakir Hassan Al-Said and Syria’s Louai Kayali. A painting by the late Egyptian painter Mahmoud Said, often a record-setter at auctions of Arab art, fetched the highest bid: “Adam and Eve,” at £633,000 (it was estimated at £300,00-£500,000). 

The same day, Sotheby’s held the seventh season of its Orientalist Sale, with Edwin Lord Weeks’ painting “Rabat (The Red Gate)” drawing the highest bid at £573,000, above its estimate of £200,000-£300,000.

At Bonham’s, a pair of gold pendant earrings from the collection of Maharani Jindan Kaur, the mother of the last Sikh ruler of the Punjab, sold for £175,000, eight times the original estimate. 

At Sotheby’s Arts of the Islamic World auction on Wednesday, an Iznik pottery flask raised the highest price, £669,000, well above the estimated £60,000-£80,000.

The Christie’s auction on Thursday featured Art of the Islamic and Indian Worlds, including Oriental rugs and carpets. A rare palimpsest of a Qur’an written over an earlier Coptic text, thought to be from Egypt and to date back to the second century, was bought for £596,750.


What We Are Buying Today: Sleysla

What We Are Buying Today: Sleysla
Photo/Supplied
Updated 23 January 2021

What We Are Buying Today: Sleysla

What We Are Buying Today: Sleysla
  • The fashion brand offers an array of products displayed in three main collections of classic, Ramadan, and winter

Sleysla is a Saudi cooperative society working brand founded more than 15 years ago by Princess Fahda bint Saud bin Abdul Aziz Al-Saud.
It has grown to become an international brand with the aim of preserving traditional Saudi handicrafts by applying them to modern design products.
The fashion brand offers an array of products displayed in three main collections of classic, Ramadan, and winter.
Each product is designed to revive an authentic symbolic item linked to Saudi heritage such as Sadu and Asiri patterns, bisht gowns, old currency, hand fans, and bags made of palm frond and crochet.
All items are made from eco-friendly and sustainable fabrics and materials and are hand-produced by skilled local artisans. One unique product is a palm leaf handwoven clutch bag with a front flap decorated with embroidery inspired by the doors and gates of Najd, specifically Al-Thumairy gate, one of the main entrances to Riyadh when the old city wall still stood.
To view these and other items visit https://www.sleysla.com/