Bangladesh PM receives Global Women’s Leadership Award

Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina receives  the Global Women’s Leadership Award from Global Summit of Women President Irene Natividad in Sydney on Friday. (Photo/PID)
Updated 27 April 2018
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Bangladesh PM receives Global Women’s Leadership Award

  • Sheikh Hasina was awarded for leadership in women’s education and entrepreneurship
  • The premier was given the award by the president of the Global Summit of Women, Irene Natividad

DHAKA: Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina received on Friday the Global Women’s Leadership Award in Sydney, Australia.

The US-based Global Summit of Women conferred the award on her for her leadership in women’s education and entrepreneurship in Bangladesh.

She received the award from summit President Irene Natividad at a gala dinner, in the presence of around 1,500 women leaders from across the world.

“We have to forge a new alliance to support women and uphold their rights,” Hasina said as she received the award to a standing ovation. 

“Together, we must act on our shared culture, tradition and values to benefit millions of women in need.”

Last year, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe was given the award. Former UN Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon and former UNESCO Director General Irina Bokova have also been among the recipients.

During her 10-year rule, Hasina has created opportunities for Bangladeshi women in the civil service, corporate, development and entrepreneurship sectors.  

But despite social development, violence against women and gender inequality remain key issues to be addressed.

“We need to ensure prompt justice against domestic violence and rape,” said Prof. Ishrat Shamim, president of the Center for Women and Children Studies in Dhaka. “It will make people aware and deter them from resorting to violence against women.”

Child marriage is also a huge concern among women’s rights activists in Bangladesh. Shamim said a minimum age for girls to get married should be set at 18. 

Currently, child marriage for girls is legal in many parts of the country under special circumstances.

“In Bangladesh, we’re experiencing a mixed situation in terms of women’s development,” Farah Kabir, country manager at Action Aid Bangladesh, told Arab News. 

“On the one hand, women are contributing to the development of society with much confidence, while on the other they’re facing violence both inside and outside the home.”

Hasina expressed her resolve to work with world leaders to overcome traditional gender stereotypes and reach out to marginalized and vulnerable women.

She stressed the need to address health hazards specific to women to enhance their productivity, and the need for equal opportunities for women in every walk of life.
 


India seizes one ton of ketamine on boat, arrests six Myanmar crew

Updated 22 September 2019

India seizes one ton of ketamine on boat, arrests six Myanmar crew

  • India’s coast guard seized $42 million worth of ketamine

NEW DELHI: India’s coast guard has arrested six Myanmar men and seized $42 million worth of ketamine after spotting a suspicious vessel in the Indian Ocean near the Nicobar Islands.
The 1,160-kilogram drug haul came after coast guard aircraft spotted the boat, which had its lights off, on Wednesday in India’s Exclusive Economic Zone, the defense ministry said in a statement.
The boat’s crew did not respond to radio calls and the coast guard eventually boarded it, with officials finding “57 gunny bundles of suspicious substance” on Friday.
“Preliminary analysis ... revealed that the suspicious substance was ketamine and there were 1,160 packets of 1kg each onboard the vessel,” the ministry added.
The six Myanmar men and cargo were taken to Port Blair, the capital of the Andaman and Nicobar Islands, where they were questioned by investigators.
They claimed they left Myanmar on September 14 and were due to rendezvous with another boat “operating near the Thailand-Malaysia maritime border line” on Saturday, the statement said.
The Nicobar Islands are located near Southeast Asia, off Myanmar’s coast.
Parts of Myanmar, Laos and Thailand are in the lawless “Golden Triangle” zone, the world’s second-largest drug-producing region after Latin America.
Large amounts drugs such as heroin and methamphetamine are churned out in remote jungle labs each year and smuggled across Asia and beyond.