Qantas orders six more Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft as jumbo jets bow out

Qantas is looking to build up its supply of 787-9 jets, which are more fuel efficient and have lower maintenance costs. (Reuters)
Updated 02 May 2018

Qantas orders six more Boeing 787 Dreamliner aircraft as jumbo jets bow out

SYDNEY: Australian national carrier Qantas on Wednesday ordered six Dreamliner planes from aviation giant Boeing to replace the last of its aging jumbo jets, which have been a staple of the firm’s fleet since 1971.
The deal, worth $1.7 billion at list prices, comes as Qantas looks to build up its supply of 787-9 jets, which are more fuel efficient and have lower maintenance costs.
To date it has taken delivery of four and a further four are due to arrive by the end of 2018. The latest batch are due by the end of 2020.
“This really is the end of one era and the start of another,” said chief executive Alan Joyce.
“The jumbo has been the backbone of Qantas International for more than 40 years and we’ve flown almost every type that Boeing built.
“It’s fitting that its retirement is going to coincide with our centenary in 2020.”
He added that the “better economics and a longer range” have allowed Qantas to open up new routes like Perth to London.
“With a larger fleet of Dreamliners, we’ll be looking at destinations in the Americas, Asia, South Africa and Europe,” he added.
The announcement was made as Qantas revealed in a trading update it was on track to post a record full-year underlying profit before tax of A$1.55 billion to A$1.60 billion.
The result, slated to be officially released in August, comes on the back of an aggressive efficiency drive that has included hefty redundancies and a shift away from loss-making routes, despite rising fuel costs.
“We’re seeing solid results from each of our business units, which is a reflection of broadly positive trading conditions and the work we’ve done to strengthen the group,” said Joyce.


Kuwait MPs launch probe into Airbus deal

Updated 19 February 2020

Kuwait MPs launch probe into Airbus deal

  • The decision came after a debate on allegations that Airbus paid kickbacks to secure a deal 6 years ago
  • The parliament also asked the finance ministry to review recent aircraft deals involving state-owned Kuwait Airways

KUWAIT CITY: Kuwait's parliament on Wednesday formed a fact-finding panel to probe alleged kickbacks in a deal between the national carrier and Airbus, which last month paid massive fines to settle bribery scandals.
The parliament's decision came after a special debate on allegations that Airbus paid kickbacks to secure a 25-aircraft deal six years ago.
It also asked the Audit Bureau, the state accounting watchdog, to investigate the deal, which was reportedly worth billions of dollars, although exact figures were never released.
Kuwait Airway Co. in 2014 ordered 15 Airbus 320neo and 10 Airbus 350, with delivery beginning last year and continuing until 2021.
Opposition lawmaker Riyadh al-Adasani told the session that Kuwait was mentioned in a settlement struck by Airbus in a British court on January 31, along with the names of some Kuwaiti officials and citizens.
Under the settlement, Airbus agreed to pay 3.6 billion euros ($3.9 billion) in fines to Britain, France and the United States to settle corruption probes into some of its aircraft sales.
Days after the settlement, Sri Lanka ordered an investigation into a multi-billion dollar aircraft purchase from Airbus after the deal was named in the settlement.
The former chief of Sri Lankan Airlines, Kapila Chandrasena, was arrested on February 6 for allegedly receiving bribes relating to the deal.
Earlier this month, two senior officials of the Malaysia-based AirAsia stepped aside while authorities probe unusual payments at the carrier, as the fallout from the Airbus scandal reverberated across the industry.
Kuwait in recent years also initiated criminal investigations into two large military aircraft deals involving Airbus -- a $9 billion Eurofighter Typhoon warplanes deal and a contract for 30 Caracal military helicopters costing $1.2 billion.