Pavilion to show Saudi short films at Cannes

A Saudi delegation is heading to Cannes to showcase the Kingdom's movie industry. (Shutterstock)
Updated 09 May 2018

Pavilion to show Saudi short films at Cannes

  • It will be the first time Saudi Arabia has participated in Cannes
  • The Saudi Film Council was launched in March by the General Culture Authority as part of Vision 2030’s goal to diversify the economy

DUBAI: A delegation from the Saudi Film Council is in France this week to showcase the Kingdom’s movie industry at the 71st Cannes Film Festival.

It will be the first time Saudi Arabia has participated in Cannes, where the country’s pavilion will show nine shorts by Saudi filmmakers and host a variety of events as part of the Marché du Film, the festival’s industry market.

The Saudi Film Council was launched in March by the General Culture Authority as part of Vision 2030’s goal to diversify the economy through industries such as tourism and culture. The invite-only Cannes Film Festival, one of the world’s most prestigious, starts Tuesday and runs until May 19. Noteworthy Arab films in competition at this year’s festival include Lebanese filmmaker Nadine Labaki’s “Capernaum,” about a rebellious teenager who sues his parents, and Egyptian-Austrian Abu Bakr Shawky’s “Yomeddine,” a road movie about a man who leaves his leper colony in search of his family.

Two Arab directors will have their debuts in the Un Certain Regard program, which features non-traditional films: Syrian director Gaya Jiji’s “My Favorite Fabric” and Moroccan director Meryem Benm’barek’s “Sofia.”


What We Are Reading Today: Horror Stories: A Memoir by Liz Phair

Updated 3 min 23 sec ago

What We Are Reading Today: Horror Stories: A Memoir by Liz Phair

  • This is a brilliantly written and completely honest, intimate and endearing memoir

The two-time Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter behind the groundbreaking album Exile in Guyville traces her life and career in a genre-bending memoir in stories about the pivotal moments that haunt her.

Horror Stories “is a literary accomplishment that reads like the confessions of a friend. It gathers up all of our isolated shames and draws them out into the light, uniting us in our shared imperfection, our uncertainty and our cowardice, smashing the stigma of not being in control,” said a review published in goodreads.com. 

“But most importantly, the uncompromising precision and candor of Horror Stories transforms these deeply personal experiences into tales about each and every one of us,” it added.

“This is a brilliantly written and completely honest, intimate and endearing memoir. It is refreshing to read a memoir that is more than just facts; one that also shares the personal feelings; personal stories and moments; the courage and despair; the pain and reality that distinguish each of us and make us who we are,” said the review.

Phair’s album Exile in Guyville was chosen as one of Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time.