Ramadan to begin Thursday as Saudi moon observers say no sight of crescent

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Photo showing the Saudi Arabian moon sighting committee, Tuesday, May 15, Al-Baha. (Observatory of the University of Majmaa)
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Photo showing the Saudi Arabian moon sighting committee, Tuesday, May 15, Al-Baha. (Observatory of the University of Majmaa)
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Photo showing the Saudi Arabian moon sighting committee, Tuesday, May 15, Al-Baha. (Observatory of the University of Majmaa)
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Photo showing the Saudi Arabian moon sighting committee, Tuesday, May 15, Al-Baha. (Observatory of the University of Majmaa)
Updated 16 May 2018

Ramadan to begin Thursday as Saudi moon observers say no sight of crescent

  • Saudi moon observers could not see the new moon on Tuesday evening
  • The Kingdom and other Muslim nations, like Indonesia, declared Ramadan would not begin on Wednesday based on the observations by moon-sighting committees

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabian moon observers said that there was no sight of the Ramadan crescent on Tuesday, meaning millions of Muslims around the world will begin the holy month on Thursday. 

According to reports on Saudi Arabian state TV, bad weather made observation of the crescent difficult. The Kingdom and other Muslim nations, like Indonesia, declared Ramadan would not begin on Wednesday based on the observations by moon-sighting committees.

Muslims around the world are set to mark the month, during which believers abstain from eating, drinking and smoking from dawn until sunset.

Fasting is intended to bring Muslims closer to Allah and remind them of those less fortunate.

The Islamic world follows a lunar calendar, and the traditional moon-sighting methodology can lead to different countries declaring the start of Ramadan a day or two apart

This year, Ramadan falls on long summer days for Muslims in the Northern Hemisphere. For Muslims who live in regions where Islam is not the dominant religion, challenging fasts are believed to come with greater blessings.

Fasting during Ramadan is one of the five obligatory pillars of Islam, along with the Muslim declaration of faith, daily prayer, annual charity -- known as "zakat" -- and performing the Hajj pilgrimage in Makkah.

 


G20’s youth-engagement group gets underway in Saudi Arabia, backed by MiSK and Ithra

Updated 14 min 29 sec ago

G20’s youth-engagement group gets underway in Saudi Arabia, backed by MiSK and Ithra

  • The member of Y20 will discuss issues that particularly affect young people around the world

RIYADH: Preparations for the Y20 summit of young people from the G20 nations, which will take place in Riyadh in October, have begun in Saudi Arabia. The summit is being organized by the Prince Mohammed bin Salman bin Abdul Aziz Foundation (MiSK) in cooperation with the King Abdul Aziz Center for World Culture (Ithra).

The members of the Y20, the official youth engagement group of the G20, will discuss issues that particularly affect young people around the world, including: global citizenship, effective problem solving that takes into account cultural differences, youth empowerment, the development of flexible and dynamic future leaders in a changing world, and preparing to meet and overcome future challenges. They will then come up with recommendations that will be submitted to world leaders during the next G20 summit, which is due to be held in November in Riyadh.

The involvement of MiSK and Ithra in the Y20 activities is an extension of the roles they play in supporting and empowering young people at local and international levels, and their belief in the fresh perspective that young people can bring to issues. Their belief in the potential of youth is reflected by a wide range of global programs, initiatives and partnerships that aim to encourage and help young people develop their ideas, become active members of the international community and contribute to sustainable development.

The Y20 is one of eight official engagement groups led by civil society organizations each year in the G20 host country. The others represent the business community (B20), civil society (C20), labor unions (L20), scientists (S20), think tanks (T20), urban issues (U20), and women (W20).