Deutsche Bank to cut over 7,000 jobs

German financial giant Deutsche Bank that the ‘associated personnel reductions are underway.’ (AFP)
Updated 24 May 2018

Deutsche Bank to cut over 7,000 jobs

FRANKFURT: Deutsche Bank said on Thursday it will reduce global staff levels to well below 90,000 from the current 97,000, as part of a broad restructuring to reduce costs and restore profitability.

The bank said it would cut headcount by 25 percent in its equities sales and trading business following a review of the business.

The reductions will decrease the investment bank’s leverage exposure by €100 billion ($117 billion), or 10 percent, with most of the cuts to take place this year, Deutsche said.

“We remain committed to our Corporate & Investment Bank and our international presence – we are unwavering in that,” Chief Executive Officer Christian Sewing said in a statement.

“We are Europe’s alternative in the international financing and capital markets business. However, we must concentrate on what we truly do well.”

The details on the bank’s strategy come ahead of the bank’s annual general meeting on Thursday.

Shareholders, fed up with a languishing share price and dwindling revenues, said they would call on the bank’s management to speed up the recovery process at the AGM.

The loss-making bank said after an abrupt management reshuffle last month that it aimed to scale back its global investment bank and refocus on Europe and its home market after three consecutive years of losses. It had flagged cuts to US bond trading, equities, and the business that serves hedge funds.

Thursday’s shareholder meeting comes after months of turmoil for the lender, Germany’s largest.

Deutsche Bank Chairman Paul Achleitner last month abruptly replaced CEO John Cryan with Sewing amid investor complaints that the bank was falling behind in executing a turnaround plan.

Deutsche’s shares are down more than 31 percent so far this year.

The bank is also under pressure from credit ratings agencies. Standard & Poor’s is expected to say by the end of the month whether it will cut Deutsche Bank’s rating after putting it on “credit watch” in April.


France ready to take Trump’s tariff threat to WTO

Updated 08 December 2019

France ready to take Trump’s tariff threat to WTO

  • Macron government will discuss a global digital tax with Washington at the OECD, says finance minister

PARIS: France is ready to go to the World Trade Organization to challenge US President Donald Trump’s threat to put tariffs on French goods in a row over a French tax on internet companies, its finance minister said on Sunday.

“We are ready to take this to an international court, notably the WTO, because the national tax on digital companies touches US companies in the same way as EU or French companies or Chinese. It is not discriminatory,” Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire told France 3 television. Paris has long complained about US digital companies not paying enough tax on revenues earned in France.

In July, the French government decided to apply a 3 percent levy on revenue from digital services earned in France by firms with more than €25 million in French revenue and €750 million ($845 million) worldwide. It is due to kick in retroactively from the start of 2019.

Washington is threatening to retaliate with heavy duties on imports of French cheeses and luxury handbags, but France and the EU say they are ready to retaliate in turn if Trump carries out the threat. Le Maire said France was willing to discuss a global digital tax with the US at the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), but that such a tax could not be optional for internet companies.

“If there is agreement at the OECD, all the better, then we will finally have a global digital tax. If there is no agreement at OECD level, we will restart talks at EU level,” Le Maire said.

He added that new EU Commissioner for Economy Paolo Gentiloni had already proposed to restart such talks.

France pushed ahead with its digital tax after EU member states, under the previous executive European Commission, failed to agree on a levy valid across the bloc after opposition from Ireland, Denmark, Sweden and Finland.

The new European Commission assumed office on Dec. 1.