Pope urges oil majors to combat global warming and aid poor

Pope Francis speaks during the Children’s Train event at the Vatican on June 9, 2018. (AFP)
Updated 09 June 2018

Pope urges oil majors to combat global warming and aid poor

  • The pope met officials from major oil and gas firms such as ExxonMobil, BP, Royal Dutch Shell
  • He said it was “disturbing” that carbon dioxide emissions remain "very high"

VATICAN CITY: Pope Francis asked Saturday that major oil and gas companies respect the 2015 Paris climate agreement to help protect the poor from global warming.
The Paris Agreement was adopted in December 2015 by 196 nations resolving to limit warming to no more than two degrees Celsius.
In a meeting with industry executives at the Vatican, the Pope said it was “disturbing” that two-and-a-half years after the deal was struck, carbon dioxide emissions and greenhouse gas levels “remain very high.”
“Yet even more worrying is the continued search for new fossil fuel reserves, whereas the Paris Agreement clearly urged keeping most fossil fuels underground,” Francis told the Energy Transition and Care for Our Common Home conference.
“Civilization requires energy, but energy use must not destroy civilization!“
The pope met officials from major oil and gas firms such as ExxonMobil, BP, Royal Dutch Shell and Norway’s state oil company Equinor.
He has long considered climate change one of the key themes of his papacy. In 2015, his second encyclical was dedicated to the issue, describing it as “one of the principal challenges facing humanity in our day.”
Francis implored the industry to halt prospection as climate change will have a disproportionate impact on the poor.
“The effects of climate change are not evenly distributed. It is the poor who suffer most from the ravages of global warming, with increasing disruption in the agricultural sector, water insecurity, and exposure to severe weather events,” he said.
“Many of those who can least afford it are already being forced to leave their homes and migrate to other places that may or may not prove welcoming.”
However with US president Donald Trump announcing America’s exit from the Paris deal, ExxonMobil has announced plans to increase oil production in the US and start dozens of projects around the world.
An estimated one billion people have no access to electricity, and the US Energy Information Administration says energy demand is set to rise 28 percent between 2015 and 2040.


Trump to issue sanctions, stop trade deal, increase tariffs on Turkey

Updated 17 min 33 sec ago

Trump to issue sanctions, stop trade deal, increase tariffs on Turkey

  • President vowed to "destroy" the Turkish economy
  • Critics say Trump's decision gave Turkey a green light to go against the Kurds

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump on Monday said that in response to Turkey's incursion into Syria he will soon issue an executive order authorizing sanctions against current and former Turkish officials, stop negotiations with Turkey on a $100 billion trade deal, and boost tariffs on Turkish steel to 50 percent.

In a statement in which he vowed to swiftly destroy the Turkish economy if it continues down "this dangerous and destructive path," Trump also said that U.S. troops coming out of Syria will redeploy and remain in the region to monitor the situation.

Before the invasion, Trump ordered a couple dozen US troops out of harm's way.

Critics say Trump's decision gave Turkey a green light to go against the Kurds, who had helped the US battle against Daesh militants.

More to follow...