WHO predicts Ebola outbreak in DR Congo could end soon

Health workers from the Democratic Republic of Congo’s health ministry wait to monitor the temperature of travelers in a port of Bangui on June 3. The ebola outbreak is DR Congo’s ninth since the first in 1976. (AFP)
Updated 11 June 2018

WHO predicts Ebola outbreak in DR Congo could end soon

KINSHASHA: The director general of the World Health Organization said Sunday he believed a swift end could be put to the outbreak of Ebola in northwestern DR Congo, some 21 days which has left 27 people dead over the past month.
“I am cautiously optimistic that we shall be able to bring it to an end soon,” Doctor Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus told reporters at Kinshasa airport.
Earlier, he had tweeted that “it’s far too early to declare victory in the #Ebola outbreak. But the signals are positive and we are cautiously optimistic.”
His comments come after the WHO and NGOs since May 21 began helping the Democratic Republic of Congo immunize front-line workers with a vaccine that has shown to be highly effective in trials, though it still awaits regulatory approval.
A total of 1,369 people have received the experimental vaccine since May 21, the ministry said last Wednesday.
Tedros is on an “evaluation” visit to the country as the WHO monitors the progress of surveillance teams of epidemiologists working to assess the situation after local authorities declared the outbreak in a remote part of the province of Equateur on May 8.
On Thursday the WHO gave a total of 59 confirmed, probable and suspected Ebola cases, of which 27 people had died with one new case confirmed on June 6.
But Tedros said the situation was improving with the last case in the town of Mbandaka diagnosed on May 20 and in the town of Bikoro, which saw the first case confirmed on May 17, with another confirmed on June 2 at nearby Iboko.
Tedros noted the cases were in “places which are not very accessible” and that the epidemiologists were going from village to village as they battled the logistical difficulties of covering ground as swiftly they could.
Bikoro is some 100 kilometers from regional center Mbandaka and 600 kilometers from Kinshasa, near the border with Congo-Brazzaville.
The outbreak is DR Congo’s ninth since the first in 1976.


Greece finalizes plan to build wall on border with Turkey

Updated 19 October 2020

Greece finalizes plan to build wall on border with Turkey

  • Four Greek construction companies have been selected to build the new wall
  • A standoff occurred at the border earlier this year after Turkey said it would no longer prevent migrants trying to reach the EU

ATHENS: Greece’s government says it has finalized plans to extend a wall along its northeast border with Turkey, over concerns that migrants may try to stage mass crossings into the European Union country.
Government spokesman Stelios Petsas said Monday that 26 kilometers (16 miles) of wall would be added to an existing 10-kilometer (six-mile) section in a 63-million-euro ($74 million) project due to be completed by the end of April.
A standoff occurred at the border earlier this year after Turkey said it would no longer prevent migrants trying to reach the EU, and tens of thousands tried to cross into Greece.
The two countries are also at odds over energy rights in the eastern Mediterranean in a dispute that has triggered a dangerous military buildup in the region and fears of conflict.
Four Greek construction companies have been selected to build the new wall and upgrade the existing section of fencing, running along or close to the Evros River, which forms much of the border between the two countries.
The wall will be made using galvanized square steel tubes and concrete foundations, according to Greece’s public order ministry.
Prime Minister Kyriakos Mitsotakis visited the border region on Saturday after a test installation of a section of the new wall.
The number of migrants and refugees traveling from Turkey to Greece fell sharply this year during the pandemic and after the border standoff prompted tougher border policing. Turkey has accused Greece of illegally pushing back migrants reaching its islands in the eastern Aegean Sea, a charge that Athens denies.
Turkey hosts the largest number of refugees worldwide, at nearly 4 million people, mostly from Syria, according to the UN Refugee Agency.