Ubisoft asks fans to design content

Joseph Gordon-Levitt, director of HitRecord, Guillaume Brunier, Senior Producer of ‘Beyond Good & Evil 2’, and Ubisoft Narrative Director Gabrielle Shrager speak onstage during the Ubisoft E3 conference at Orpheum Theatre on June 11, 2018 in Los Angeles, California. (AFP)
Updated 13 June 2018

Ubisoft asks fans to design content

LOS ANGELES: French video game giant Ubisoft is teaming up with a firm founded by actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt to crowdsource material for a new title, it was announced on the eve of the Electronic Entertainment Expo (E3).
Ubisoft has long tapped into feedback from players while designing games, but the latest step will allow some to have content woven into scenes.
An invitation to collaborate went live Monday on the website of Gordon-Levitt’s Hit Record, with the first project being to make music to be aired on a space pirate radio station in Ubisoft’s “Beyond Good and Evil 2,” a science fiction shooter crafted to be a space opera.
“The point of Hit Record is for people to make things together,” he said. “This is the first time we are going to make assets going into a video game, which I think is really cool.”
“This is not just submitting songs,” he added. “We will be making the music together.”
Someone in one country may come up with a bass line, and another elsewhere the drum beat or various instrumentals, according to Gordon-Levitt.
Among other coming games shown off by Ubisoft was psychological thriller “Transference,” a collaboration with Hollywood star Elijah Wood, which will see players grapple with twists and mysteries of a deranged mind.
Wood promised the game “will leave you with haunting memories long after you put down the controller.”
Ubisoft gave clips of a sequel to its history-based adventure franchise “Assassin’s Creed,” set in Greece in the time of Socrates, and roused the crowd with a marching band and performers introducing a new entry to the hit “Just Dance” dancing game franchise.


Thailand finance minister: economy to recover next year with 4% growth

Updated 23 November 2020

Thailand finance minister: economy to recover next year with 4% growth

  • Economy had bottomed but recovery was not fast as the battered tourism sector hurt supply chains
  • Budget for the next fiscal year will still focus on boosting domestic activity

BANGKOK: Thailand’s economy is expected to grow 4 percent in 2021 after a slump this year and fiscal policy will support a tourism-reliant economy struggling from the impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, the finance minister said on Monday.
Southeast Asia’s second-largest economy shrank a less than expected 6.4 percent in the third quarter from a year earlier after falling 12.1 percent in the previous three months.
The economy had bottomed but recovery was not fast as the battered tourism sector, which accounts for about 12 percent of gross domestic product (GDP), has also hurt supply chains, Finance minister Arkhom Termpittayapaisith said.
“Without the COVID, our economy could have expanded 3 percent this year, he said. “As we expect a 6 percent contraction this year, there is the output gap of 9 percent,” he told a business forum.
“Next year, we expect 4 percent growth, which is still not 100 percent yet,” Arkhom said, adding it could take until 2022 to return to pre-pandemic levels.
There is still fiscal policy room to help growth from this year’s fiscal budget and some from rehabilitation spending, he said.
The budget for the next fiscal year will still focus on boosting domestic activity, Arkhom said, and the current public debt of 49 percent of GDP was manageable.
Of the government’s 1 trillion baht ($33 billion) borrowing plan, 400 billion would be for economic revival, of which about 120 billion-130 billion has been approved, Arkhom said.
He wants the Bank of Thailand to take more action short term on the baht, which continued to rise on Monday, despite central bank measures announced on Friday to rein in the currency strength.
“They have done that and they have their measures... which should be introduced gradually and more intensely,” Arkhom said.