Deadly battles continue to power blockbuster video games

Gamers play 'Fortnite' against Twitch streamer and professional gamer Tyler 'Ninja' Blevins during Ninja Vegas '18 at Esports Arena, Luxor Hotel and Casino, in Las Vegas, Nevada. (Getty Images)
Updated 12 June 2018

Deadly battles continue to power blockbuster video games

  • Deadly conflicts played out with stunning arsenals in creative fictional settings remain at the heart of blockbuster action video games, with imagery getting richer and fight mechanics smoother with improved technology.
  • A hot video game trend now is “Battle Royale” death-match games such as “Fortnite” and “PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds” in which players vie to be the sole survivor.

LOS ANGELES: Bandits, soldiers, demons, zombies, aliens and other enemies will be shot, stabbed, bludgeoned, incinerated, or even blown up on the show floor of the Electronic Entertainment Expo in Los Angeles.
Deadly conflicts played out with stunning arsenals in creative fictional settings remain at the heart of blockbuster action video games, with imagery getting richer and fight mechanics smoother with improved technology.
There was no shortage of bloody battles in games spotlighted at media events hosted by video game industry titans in the days leading up to E3 showcase.
A hot video game trend now is “Battle Royale” death-match games such as “Fortnite” and “PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds” in which players vie to be the sole survivor.
Shooting and swordplay have long been staples in a global video game industry that the Entertainment Software Association said took in a total of $116 billion worldwide last year.
Violence in games has the trade group working to make sure politicians, including US President Donald Trump, understand that there is no link between that kind of play and what people do in the real world, ESA Chief Executive Michael Gallagher told AFP.
Trump and the ESA met earlier this year after the shootings at a US high school.
Some have blamed violence in media such as video games, rather than access to guns, for attacks.
“One thing that has sunk in to a great degree is the truth that video game violence has nothing to do with real-world violence,” Gallagher said commenting on meetings held with federal and state politicians.
“There are 2.6 billion gamers around the world, yet these outbreaks are uniquely American. It has got to be something else.”
A growing number of policy makers are “rejecting the notion outright” that video games cause people to commit actual violence, according to Gallagher.
“The tide has turned significantly,” he added.
In the US, 22 states offer video game companies economic incentives to set up and create jobs, according to Gallagher.
About 45,000 industry members are expected to attend E3, along with 15,000 gamers who bought tickets to get access to the show floor and its 200 exhibitors, the ESA said.


Malaysia to study impact of India’s planned trade action

A truck carrying oil palm fruits passes through Felda Sahabat plantation in Lahad Datu in Malaysia's state of Sabah on Borneo island, February 20, 2013. (REUTERS)
Updated 14 October 2019

Malaysia to study impact of India’s planned trade action

  • Malaysia’s key imports from India include petroleum products, live animals and meats, metals, chemicals and chemical products

KUALA LUMPUR: Malaysia’s Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad said his government will monitor the trade situation with India, which is reported to be considering trade curbs on the Southeast Asian nation over his criticism of actions in Kashmir, news wire Bernama reported.
Government and industry sources told Reuters last week that New Delhi is looking for ways to limit palm oil imports and other goods from Malaysia, in retaliation for Mahathir’s speech at the United Nations in September when he said India had “invaded and occupied” Jammu and Kashmir. Malaysia had said it did not receive “anything official” from India.
Mahathir said on Sunday his government will “study the impact of the action taken by India,” the government-owned Bernama said.
“They are exporting goods to Malaysia too. It’s not just one-way trade, it’s two-way trade,” Mahathir was quoted as saying in the report.
India is the world’s biggest importer of edible oils, and is the biggest buyer of Malaysian palm oil. It bought 3.9 million tons of Malaysian palm oil in the first nine months of 2019, according to data compiled by the Malaysian Palm Oil Board.
Malaysia’s key imports from India include petroleum products, live animals and meats, metals, chemicals and chemical products.