Mounay gives the kaftan a contemporary update

Mounay’s 2018 Ramadan edit is all about eastern glamor. (Photos supplied)
Updated 13 June 2018

Mounay gives the kaftan a contemporary update

  • Regional contemporary ready-to-wear brand Mounay’s Ramadan edit for 2018 is all about eastern glamour
  • The brand is the brainchild of creative director Mona Ead Mikati

DUBAI: One of our favorite things about some Ramadan capsule collections is that they don’t go out of style once the Holy Month is over — they last well into the Eid period and beyond. One label has released some of the most versatile, timeless and easy-to-wear looks in its seasonal capsule that fashion lovers will no doubt be revisiting in the months to come.

Regional contemporary ready-to-wear brand Mounay’s Ramadan edit for 2018 is all about eastern glamor, with flirty, loose cuts and charming gathers, tailored looks and delicate piping that all stand out in its latest range of abayas, capes and kaftans. Comprising soft whites mixed with deep, darker tones — not to mention a dash of gold foiling here and there — each piece features sharp lines cut through beautiful gentle forms. The result is a sartorial collection full of contrasts in texture, color and volume. Impossibly feminine, a particular gem are Mounay’s signature oversized sleeves that are very flattering.

Mounay, which was launched in 2013, is, who juggles her work between Dubai and Beirut. The brand prides itself on its “carefully picked fabric, beautifully designed cuts and eye-catching colors,” according to its website.


Explaining the design process to Arab News, Mikati — who majored in business at the American University of Beirut before going on to study at the Fashion Institute of Technology in New York — said: “The creative process going through this collection was challenging as I wanted to introduce a contemporary take on traditional, Arabic-style kaftans.”

For Mikati, Mounay is all about the “mélange of the feminine and the edgy,” creating a contemporary ready-to-wear label “that seamlessly embodies and empowers the woman of today.”

In an interview with blogger Lana El-Sahely, published on the influencer’s website, she elaborated: “Every collection has to offer something new while keeping the brand’s identity from one season to another. The ‘Mounay woman’ is modern and edgy, but is also very proud of her feminine side and not afraid to show it.”

She continued: “It is very important for Mounay garments to be as beautifully made on the inside as the outside. I am very lucky to have a wonderful, detail-oriented and very professional production team based in Beirut. We work on each piece as if it was our only one.”

As mentioned earlier, the word “timeless” is one that can be associated with this brand, and this is perhaps down to Mikati’s personal style.

“I usually prefer classic items as they are timeless, but make sure to give my outfits a more contemporary twist by paying attention to little details. I’d definitely rather look overdressed than be under-dressed,” she told El-Sahely.

And her fashion icons also seem to be timeless in their style.

“My all-time favorite is Audrey Hepburn, because I am a fan of classic beauty and elegance. I also always make sure to check out Queen Rania of Jordan’s latest outfits — the lady-like elegance she portrays is very inspirational,” the designer said, according to lanaelsahely.com.

The collection is available online via mounay.com, ounass.com or at the Tryano department store in Abu Dhabi, the UAE.


Elle Fanning poses in fairytale Reem Acra gown

Elle Fanning stars in ‘Maleficent: Mistress of Evil.’ (Getty)
Updated 23 October 2019

Elle Fanning poses in fairytale Reem Acra gown

DUBAI: Hollywood actress Elle Fanning, the star of Disney’s latest fairytale flick “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil,” just posed for a photoshoot in an ethereal gown by Lebanese designer Reem Acra.

The star posed alongside Angelina Jolie for People magazine wearing a blush gown by the designer.

In the series of playful images, Fanning wears a horned headpiece — usually worn by Jolie’s character, Maleficent — and a gown with a sweetheart neckline and beaded bodice. The geometric beading runs across the length of the gown, which also features a barely-there belt to cinch in the waist and a spray of tulle at the hip.

“Fairytale magic. @ElleFanning wears #ReemAcraBohemianDisco while promoting her latest film #Maleficent2,” the Lebanese fashion house posted on its Instagram account.

In “Maleficent: Mistress of Evil,” the sequel set six years later, Maleficent hardly lives up to that title, but rumor would have it otherwise. The story of the sleeping beauty Aurora (Fanning) has spread across the land, painting Maleficent as the villain, rather than the one whose love saved her. Now, as Aurora plans to marry Prince Phillip (Harris Dickinson), Maleficent must meet the neighboring Queen Ingrith (Michelle Pfeiffer), who wishes to destroy Maleficent and her magical world.

While the film features a lot of violent spectacle, the inner conflict of the lead characters themselves is whether they are strong enough to resist becoming violent, rather than the inverse.

“That’s something that isn’t portrayed a lot on screen — a lot of princesses grew up and they said, ‘Well, we’re going to make her a strong princess, and we’re going to make her tough, so we’re going to make her fight!’ Is that what being a strong woman means? We’re going to have to have a sword and armor on and fight? Aurora can do that in a different way, in a pink dress. It’s beautiful that she keeps her softness and vulnerabilities as her strengths,” Fanning told Arab News in a previous interview.

“Maleficent: Mistress of Evil” debuted atop the North American box office at the weekend, but the big-budget fantasy flick fell far short of expectations, industry figures showed Monday.

The film took in $36.9 million, but that was well shy of projections that it would earn $45 million and a sharp drop-off from the first film’s $69.4 million launch in 2014.