Thousands of expats quit Oman as visa ban continues

A market in Oman's capital Muscat. (Shutterstock)
Updated 19 June 2018

Thousands of expats quit Oman as visa ban continues

  • Expats make up 44.1 percent of Oman’s total population which stands at 4,612,824
  • Earlier this year, expat workers in the country faced a six-month visa ban across 87 industries

DUBAI: Oman’s expat population has dropped 2 percent according to figures released in June, 2018, compared to the same time the previous year, local daily Times of Oman reported.
According to government figures there were 43,000 fewer expats recorded in 2018 compared to the previous year – bringing the population of foreign nationals down to 2,035,952.
Expats make up 44.1 percent of Oman’s total population which stands at 4,612,824.
Earlier this year, expat workers in the country faced a six-month visa ban across 87 industries, including media, engineering, marketing and sales, accounting and finance, IT, insurance, technicians, administration and HR.
The Oman government announced last month that the ban would remain in place and that it was considering adding more professions, adding that Omanis should always be the first choice for jobs in the country.
The Omanization drive is part of a government’s push to recruit more of its own citizens, a similar push is underway across the GCC where countries like Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have also been trying to increase the number of locals in employment.


Egypt expects several share offerings by end of year

Updated 15 September 2019

Egypt expects several share offerings by end of year

  • One small company worth about 50 million Egyptian pounds was also expected to offer shares on the Nile Stock Exchange

CAIRO: Egypt expects two state companies and one private pharmaceuticals firm worth more than $61.3 million, or one billion Egyptian pounds, to make share offerings by the end of the year, an official at the Financial Regulatory Authority said on Sunday.
One small company worth about 50 million Egyptian pounds was also expected to offer shares on the Nile Stock Exchange, which specializes in small and medium sized enterprises, said Sayed Abdel Fadeel, head of the authority’s corporate finance department. He did not name the companies.
Egypt promised to sell minority stakes in several state companies in late 2018 but postponed the offerings following emerging market turbulence.